Contractor Association – IFAWPCA http://ifawpca.org/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 03:46:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ifawpca.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Contractor Association – IFAWPCA http://ifawpca.org/ 32 32 SD phone companies want to prevent newcomers from getting subsidies for underserved areas https://ifawpca.org/sd-phone-companies-want-to-prevent-newcomers-from-getting-subsidies-for-underserved-areas/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 02:35:00 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/sd-phone-companies-want-to-prevent-newcomers-from-getting-subsidies-for-underserved-areas/ PIERRE, SD (KELO) – South Dakota state government regulators on Wednesday opened a hearing into whether a Minnesota-based broadband and telephone company was eligible for a possible federal government grant which the company says it needs to provide services to some underserved parts of South Dakota. LTD Broadband has applied to the South Dakota Public […]]]>

PIERRE, SD (KELO) – South Dakota state government regulators on Wednesday opened a hearing into whether a Minnesota-based broadband and telephone company was eligible for a possible federal government grant which the company says it needs to provide services to some underserved parts of South Dakota.

LTD Broadband has applied to the South Dakota Public Utilities Commission for designation as an eligible telecommunications carrier. This status is required before the Federal Communications Commission can release money from its Rural Digital Opportunity Fund that has been provisionally allocated to the company.

LTD Broadband is not yet certified to operate in South Dakota, although it serves 259 customers. The company wants to use the federal grant, estimated at $ 46.6 million in total over 10 years, to serve more than 7,000 households and businesses in rural areas of Brookings, Butte, Clay, Codington, Corson, Custer, Deuel , Dewey, Hamlin, Hand, Jones, Lake, Lawrence, Lincoln, Lyman, Meade, Minnehaha, Pennington, Stanley, Todd, Union and Yankton counties.

State rule requires that a candidate for the eligibility designation provide service in a timely manner, remain functional in an emergency, meet consumer protection and quality of service standards, and demonstrate that service is in the public interest.

A commitment letter of credit of $ 4,658,845.38 for the company to the FCC is pending for work in South Dakota. However, LTD Broadband met stiff resistance from the South Dakota Telecommunication Association, which represents 18 rural operators.

This opposition manifested itself in the sometimes grueling back-and-forth between the association’s executive director and general counsel, Kara Semmler, and LTD owner and CEO Corey Hauer, on Wednesday.

Hauer admitted that he did not plan to have offices with daily staff in South Dakota. He already has customer service staff in South Dakota working from home, and he plans to recruit more.

Semmler, through a series of questions, showed that Hauer did not understand how the subsidized broadband expansion in South Dakota worked, and that Hauer did not know how many of South Dakota’s telecommunications providers were owned by co-ops. , tribal governments or corporations. LTD Broadband is based in Minnesota, where Hauer previously lived, but now resides in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Semmler said LTD was non-compliant in Iowa for failing to file a 2019 report, but Hauer said LTD served its first customer from Iowa in 2020. Hauer said the website of The Iowa Utility Board was not configured to accept an 18 cent payment LTD owed and agreed that the Iowa Board of Directors decided not to extend the company’s status to other blocks census. He said the Iowa decision will be appealed.

Semmler, who was previously an attorney for the South Dakota commission and later served on Gov. Kristi Noem’s staff, asked the commissioners to take judicial notice of what happened in Iowa. “This is a public record, and it is fair that I ask questions about it,” she argued. Commissioners Gary Hanson and Chris Nelson said they wanted to hear Hauer’s answers.

“Iowa didn’t give us an audience,” Hauer told them. He said one of the Iowa board members previously managed a rural Iowa carrier and recused himself, leaving the other two to speak out against LTD. Hauer called their decision petty. “They never did what they did at LTD,” he said. “I think they are very out of the norm in their actions.”

Commissioner Nelson showed Hauer a map where South Dakota Telecommunications has committed to building “fiber to the local” in 2021 or 2022. Nelson said that one third to one half of the census blocks LTD plans to serve would be built by those current telecoms in a year and a half.

“Does that make you reconsider how much of the state you really want to serve?” Nelson asked. Hauer agreed that LTD would have to pay a federal fine for opting out. “Perfection is the enemy of good in this case,” Hauer said. He added that it “makes me wonder” why South Dakota would make commitments independent of the RDOF federal grant. “We haven’t seen this in any other state,” Hauer said.

Nelson said LTD’s reputation in other states was not positive. Nelson said he called LTD a year ago, spent 40 minutes on the phone before asking someone to take his information and is still waiting for a callback. Hauer said that is not the current situation.

“When I look at the administrative rule, it doesn’t say anything about reputation. But – ”said Nelson. Hauer said the Iowa decision reflected rural telephone service providers who wanted the money for themselves. “They literally describe us as the devil,” Hauer said, adding that LTD is gaining business in other states: “Customers voted with their wallets.

Nelson asked if LTD would be interested in obtaining RDOF grant eligibility only for areas of South Dakota where existing providers do not have service expansion plans for the next several years. Hauer has stated that LTD is committed to fulfilling the RDOF obligation. “It’s kind of the elephant in my mind,” said Nelson.

As a SDTC witness, Semmler called Larry Thompson, Managing Director of Vantage Point Solutions, a Mitchell-based broadband service company. Thompson said Vantage Point has been involved in broadband plans for about half of South Dakota and has worked for clients in about 45 states.

Thompson estimated LTD’s construction costs for South Dakota at $ 91 million and predicted the company would lose $ 65 million in the first six years and possibly as much as $ 130 million. LTD declined to reveal its plan for South Dakota, arguing that finances are not criteria for the commission’s decision. “It just doesn’t make sense,” Thompson said of LTD’s approach.

The lawyer representing LTD, Jason Sutton of Sioux Falls, showed Thompson a document in a related file where LTD and the Telecommunications Association agreed that LTD had the legally required capacity to provide services in South Dakota. Semmler objected, arguing that Sutton was asking Thompson for a legal conclusion, and Sutton withdrew the question.

Thompson acknowledged that Vantage Point had been hired by some of the telecommunications companies that would compete in areas where LTD plans to build and that Vantage Point was an associate member of the association. Thompson said LTD would lose $ 6 billion in the 15 states where it received interim approval from the FCC. Thompson said it was correct that he had “no knowledge” of the overall LTD model.

Thompson stood by his statement that LTD would fail. “If they go ahead with their RDOF earnings, that’s okay,” said Thompson. He assumed it would happen within the first six years. As for Hauer’s claim that he has five sources of funding, Thompson said he “couldn’t find anyone who would fund what I’m seeing.”

“Nothing I heard today made me change my mind,” said Thompson.

Commissioner Nelson asked Thompson if the FCC was responsible for the decision. Thompson said FCC members likely had other factors in mind than what was best for South Dakota.

“What other factors? Nelson asked.

“Politics,” Thompson replied.

In rebuttal, Hauer said he believed the FCC was in a position to make a decision that was best for South Dakota. Hauer said he would like to be the contractor for a Vantage Point project. He said it was “not surprising” that hiring an outside contractor costs more than $ 20,000 per mile for laying fiber. He said LTD plans to hire its own workforce.

Thompson said laying fiber in the Black Hills costs $ 90,000 to $ 130,000 per mile. Nelson asked Thompson if there was a scenario that would only cost $ 10,000 per mile. Thompson said there were too many variables, calling it a “complicated process.”

Lawyers will file briefs after the hearing. The parties will then present closing arguments. “I would like to hear him argue,” said Commissioner Nelson.


Source link

]]>
Complaints of broken street lights have more than tripled in Philly, and some neighborhoods are darker than ever https://ifawpca.org/complaints-of-broken-street-lights-have-more-than-tripled-in-philly-and-some-neighborhoods-are-darker-than-ever/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 10:08:24 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/complaints-of-broken-street-lights-have-more-than-tripled-in-philly-and-some-neighborhoods-are-darker-than-ever/ Denise Wilson doesn’t see a lot of crime in her neighborhood – but again, she can’t see much after dark. Dozens of streetlights in its lower northeastern Philadelphia neighborhood have been said to have been off for weeks. As night falls, the drab, yellow glow of the corner bodega’s sign is the brightest light on […]]]>

Denise Wilson doesn’t see a lot of crime in her neighborhood – but again, she can’t see much after dark.

Dozens of streetlights in its lower northeastern Philadelphia neighborhood have been said to have been off for weeks. As night falls, the drab, yellow glow of the corner bodega’s sign is the brightest light on its street, in the Crescentville section of town.

“It’s like being in a dark tunnel,” said Wilson, 48. “Daylight saving only made it worse.”

Wilson’s block is not an outlier. The streets of Philadelphia are darker than they have been in years. City officials let a light maintenance contract expire in June and took more than three months to negotiate a new deal – with the same contractor, at more than triple the price.

Since then, reports of extinguished streetlights have more than tripled, according to an Inquirer analysis of data from the city’s 311 complaints. Prior to this year, the city received an average of 900 complaints per month from residents about street light failures. But since July, that number has swelled, averaging around 3,000 per month, including duplicate outage reports.

Fewer complaints are also resolved. Today, Philadelphia has the largest backlog of broken lights since the city began tracking the problem in 2014. For the first time, blackouts are among the two most common 311 complaints in the city – exceeding the most common nuisance. more common such as illegal landfills, graffiti or garbage collection delays. (Abandoned cars are still at the top of the grievance list.)

On blocks like Wilson’s, the impact of months of deferred lamppost maintenance is clearly visible – and it can be more than just a nuisance.

Wilson said one of his neighbors was robbed on his way home at night in early November, and it was so dark the woman couldn’t even describe her attacker.

Then, on the evening of November 20, a gunman shot dead Jessica Covington, 32, and her unborn child as she got out of her car a few steps from Wilson’s house. The district attorney’s office said police investigators recovered CCTV footage, but many broken street lights left the footage “extremely” dark.

Police have yet to make an arrest.

The city should have known about this problem, Wilson said. Data from the 311 calls show residents have registered nearly 30 complaints this year about broken lights within a two-block radius of where Covington was killed. Few have been corrected.

“We’ve been complaining for months,” Wilson said. “The lights are out and that makes him so dangerous. “

The city’s street service is responsible for the maintenance of more than 148,000 lampposts.

The backlog dates back to July, shortly after a municipal contract expired with a maintenance company hired to fix broken street lights, known as American Lighting & Signalization (ALS). Streets Department spokeswoman Crystal Jacobs said the department only started looking for a replacement contract in August and it was not until mid-October to finalize a deal. relying on a few in-house technicians and an emergency maintenance provider for four months.

The streets department said negotiations were delayed because the department “hoped to negotiate a better rate based on the terms of the requirements contract,” Jacobs said.

Despite the months of waiting, the seller has not changed. ALS won the new one-year contract to continue servicing the streetlights, growing from $ 2 million to over $ 6.5 million. Jacobs said it was the lowest offer, which the city must accept by law, and blamed labor shortages and wage rates.

ALS could not be reached for comment.

The delay resulted in more than 12,700 open service requests for outages, according to 311. The streets department – which says it can fix about 2,000 lights a month with an active contractor – was unable to provide schedule on how long it would take to catch up. on repairs.

“Crews continue to reduce the current backlog while responding to incoming calls,” said Jacobs.

The backlog has also accumulated at a time when the street service is modernizing its entire lighting network.

In 2019, the city pledged to replace existing high-pressure sodium bulbs with modern LED lights – a long-awaited infrastructure upgrade that would generate more ambient light with less energy. The timeline was set for two or three years, but to date the ministry says it has only installed about 12,000 LED lights out of the 100,000 on offer.

Meanwhile, the growing blackouts have left many residents, like Wilson, saying they are more afraid of crime, while pedestrians, cyclists and drivers say dim light makes roads less safe at night.

It’s hard to say how far-reaching the impact of street light outages has been on crime in Philadelphia. But Aaron Chalfin, assistant professor of criminology at the University of Pennsylvania, noted that lighting has long affected criminal behavior in both obvious and surprising ways.

Chalfin conducted a study of the Chicago Lighting Network and found that crime did not necessarily increase in blocks with multiple light failures, but rather that adjacent streets peaked.

The reason: people were more likely to avoid blocks with broken lights.

“This is proof that crime is light sensitive,” Chalfin said. “The light will change human activity and crime. “

But some parts of the city lived more in the Dark Ages than others.

Data shows Northeast Philadelphia and South Philadelphia, two dense areas, had the highest concentration of extinguished bulb reports, with thousands of open complaints, while less populated areas like Chestnut Hill had them. less than a hundred.

Elected officials took note. In September, State Representative Chris Rabb, who represents parts of northwest Philadelphia, tweeted a complaint about a light near his house that had been off for about four weeks. “You [folks] usually repairs these lights in a day or two! He tweeted to the streets department.

District city council offices have also been inundated with voter service calls regarding persistent delays in minor repairs. West Philadelphia council member Jamie Gauthier’s district has been hit hard by the blackouts – with over 800 open complaints about broken lights pending. His office alone has filed 28 reports of broken lighting at 311 since July.

“I’m frustrated with the city’s lack of action,” said Gauthier.

Pedestrian and cyclist advocates also lament the delays, noting that dimly lit streets create dangerous conditions for everyone on the streets at night.

James Gitto, president of the West Passyunk Neighbors Association and a member of the board of trustees of 5th Square, the town planners political action committee, lives in a hard-hit section of South Philadelphia – which has the most reported blackouts of all postal codes and the second highest rate per capita.

The breakdowns are particularly visible on foot or by bicycle.

“People drive without headlights and you can’t see the cars coming,” Gitto said. “You also never know if there is a giant hole in the road.”

Jacobs, the head of the streets department, said there was no prioritization process for certain areas or neighborhoods. Requests through 311 are assigned to technicians, who then determine the route to complete repairs, Jacobs said.

Sometimes, however, repairs seem to happen faster when the problem is brought to light.

Last week, a bright lamp lit for the first time in months at the corner of where Jessica Covington was killed in Crescentville, lighting up a sanctuary with stuffed animals and flowers.

The street service confirmed that technicians had arrived to repair the light above the crime scene the day after the murder news was announced.

But Wilson, the neighbor, says the city only fixed one of the many unlit bulbs on the dark block.

“The others,” Wilson said, “are still absent.”



Source link

]]>
Downtown development | Homes and Lofts: More People Choose to Live Downtown | New https://ifawpca.org/downtown-development-homes-and-lofts-more-people-choose-to-live-downtown-new/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/downtown-development-homes-and-lofts-more-people-choose-to-live-downtown-new/ JOHNSTOWN, Pennsylvania – Many historic homes in Johnstown have been destroyed or have been demolished. In the 200 block of Lincoln Street, a block once populated by Victorian-style homes, only a few still stand – and only one is currently occupied. Chad McLaren and Austin Hoffman bought a home there in July, and they have […]]]>

JOHNSTOWN, Pennsylvania – Many historic homes in Johnstown have been destroyed or have been demolished.

In the 200 block of Lincoln Street, a block once populated by Victorian-style homes, only a few still stand – and only one is currently occupied.

Chad McLaren and Austin Hoffman bought a home there in July, and they have plans to help prevent Johnstown from losing more of its historic residential nature.

Their home, built in 1890, survived the Johnstown floods of 1936 and 1977.

Inside, the original ramp, stained glass and hardwood floors are intact.

The exterior needs some work, they said, and they plan to get started as soon as they can find a contractor.

They also bought an empty lot just across the street. It is a large brown grassy area, visible from the inclined plane. They plan to plant a vibrant garden there in the spring.

They paid $ 28,500 in cash for the house and land, and for that price, McLaren is surprised that other downtown properties remain seemingly unwanted.

“There are beautiful houses and buildings downtown that just sit there,” McLaren said.

McLaren, 35, is from Summerhill Borough, and Hoffman, 33, is from eastern Pennsylvania.

They’ve been waiting for a downtown home to hit the market since they returned to the area months ago from Norfolk, Va., Where McLaren served in the US Navy.

“We absolutely chose to live here and our quality of life has improved,” said McLaren. “It’s the pace of life, the cost of living.”

‘Lots of amenities’

Bill and Kim McKinney also took a leap of faith to save a piece of downtown Johnstown.

They are renovating an eight-story building at 605 Main Street, which dates back to 1904. It was once the Carnegie Building and, more recently, the home of Cambria Jewelers.

They call their 18,000 square foot building the “Lofts on the Upper Main”.

Construction began about two months ago and their plan is to sell floors of over 2,000 square feet each.

The McKinneys sold their house in Westmont to move downtown.

“I really wasn’t on board at first because we built our house 27 years ago,” said Kim McKinney. “But we have no regrets. We really enjoy being part of the city center.

Bill McKinney said he’s noticing more concerts in Central Park in Johnstown or at Peoples Natural Gas Park. He also highlighted plans by the Johnstown Recreation Commission to bring more entertainment to state-of-the-art Sargent Stadium.

“I think we’re in the middle of a process of something new,” Bill said. “I think there are a lot of amenities that people don’t realize are downtown.”

“We feel like in New York”

McLaren said he and Hoffman were also in the early stages of forming an association of downtown residents.

Their association would aim to adopt projects including parks and present residential needs to the municipal council.

“There are a lot of people who live downtown, and we want to stand up for that,” McLaren said. “I don’t think he’s getting enough attention.”

Francis Ryan, 97, has lived in the downtown 1st arrondissement since returning from World War II in 1946, he said.

Looking from his porch on the 200 block of Union Street, he noticed that there isn’t a house all the way across town at Washington Street.

“Everywhere you see a parking lot now, there was a house there,” he said.

Ryan was a crane operator for the former Bethlehem Steel Co. He quit that job after the 1977 flood, he said, because he saw the company downsizing.

“There aren’t many houses left in the city,” he says.

The 2020 census showed that Johnstown’s population declined by 12% to around 18,000, continuing decades of population loss. The last time the population was less than 20,000 was in 1880, when Johnstown was in its infancy and promising.

Thrilled with new businesses and residential interest in the city center, McLaren said he wanted to make the city center more recognizable as a 24-hour neighborhood, not a place to work, and then return to Richland or Westmont.

He said he liked being within walking distance of a variety of shops and restaurants.

“And we’re basically next to the library, not to mention the Cambria County War Memorial Concert Hall and Peoples Natural Gas Park – another underrated asset,” McLaren said. “Or you can walk to the station and be in New York in a matter of hours.”

Hoffman hopes to have a small impact in pushing the population numbers up over the next few years.

As a board member of the Discover Downtown Johnstown Partnership, he saw how the group’s Taste & Tour event last year drew people downtown.

“During this event, downtown looks like New York and that only represents 700 people,” he said. “I think that’s a realistic number to attract to live here.”

Hoffman works remotely in the healthcare industry. McLaren moved from active duty to the Naval Reserve and is a full-time student on the GI Bill at Indiana University in Pennsylvania.

“What a city center should be”

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an unexpected demand for private housing and office space in the low-cost small Johnstown market, said Howard Hanna Johnstown real estate agent Barry Gallagher.

“The idea of ​​office space, especially during the pandemic – it’s like a drug on the market,” he said.

Gallagher said he saw people who worked remotely move to Johnstown. and retirees who have moved over the years are also coming back, he said.

Millennials and baby boomers are the crowd that downtown Johnstown, and inner cities in general, are likely to attract the most, said Laquan Marshall, CEO of Johnstown Capital Partners, LLC.

In addition to the downtown mixed commercial-residential buildings, the company also completed the renovation of a house at block 200 of Vine Street. So far, an itinerant nurse has shown interest, he said.

Years ago Sharon Honkus, owner of Celestial Brides on Market Street, developed residential lofts above Classic Elements on Main Street.

“My partners and I bought this building 14 years ago and converted the upper floors into lofts,” she said. “We were one of the first to take over a building and do it. and now it’s turning into what a downtown should be: foot traffic, people who want to live downtown.

Russ O’Reilly is a reporter for The Tribune-Democrat. Follow him on twitter @RussellOReilly.



Source link

]]>
Entrepreneur Sector supports Margaret Beels as new Director of Labor Market Enforcement https://ifawpca.org/entrepreneur-sector-supports-margaret-beels-as-new-director-of-labor-market-enforcement/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 10:00:26 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/entrepreneur-sector-supports-margaret-beels-as-new-director-of-labor-market-enforcement/ The long vacant post of Director of Labor Market Enforcement was finally filled – by the government appointing Margaret Beels. Advisors like James Poyser of offpayroll.org, Jo Harris of Parasol and Hannah Morrison of Brabners have each criticized the government at ContractorUK for leaving the post vacant for 11 months. Even the former manager, Matthew […]]]>

The long vacant post of Director of Labor Market Enforcement was finally filled – by the government appointing Margaret Beels.

Advisors like James Poyser of offpayroll.org, Jo Harris of Parasol and Hannah Morrison of Brabners have each criticized the government at ContractorUK for leaving the post vacant for 11 months.

Even the former manager, Matthew Taylor, said it was “confusing” and “sad” that the government did not replace him quickly, despite his offer to work “unpaid if necessary” until his successor is found.

“Deeply concerning”

IR35 expert Rebecca Seeley Harris, who called “deeply concerning” the fact that no enforcement chief was in place in a time of ploys and scams, said the wait was worth it.

“I am delighted that Margaret Beels has been appointed the new DLME,” the former Treasury Member responsible for Intermediary Legislation told ContractorUK yesterday.

Patron of ReLegal Consulting, she adds: “[Beels] has a lot of knowledge and affinities with this field, having received an OBE for services rendered to modern slavery and labor exploitation.

“A real idea of ​​what is going on”

Julia Kermode of IWORK agrees. “It’s a fantastic meeting [given Beels’] experience at the Gangmasters and Labor Abuse Authority.

“Shell [therefore] have in-depth knowledge of how vulnerable workers are exploited

“I was worried that the new DLME was someone a bit distant with no real idea of ​​what’s going on, but I’m very happy to be wrong,” she said.

‘Strategic direction’

Beel’s tenure as DLME states that she will set the “strategic direction” of the three labor market enforcement agencies – EASI, the HMRC National Minimum Wage Team and GLAA.

But the ex-head of compliance at British Gas will have to go beyond simple guidance to make a dent, according to Kate Cottrell, status specialist, formerly of HMRC.

“Hopefully this role is not only to define strategic directions, but that it will also have real teeth”, began the co-founder of Bauer & Cottrell.

“Let us also hope that his role is one that [puts in place] urgent implementation of a framework regulation. And in priority.

“Proliferation of disguised remuneration”

Professional Passport also welcomed the nomination, on the same terms – but suggests that these are projects masquerading as “umbrellas” that should top Beels’ “to-do” list.

“We welcome the appointment of Margaret Beels to her new post. [but] we urge it to step up its activities to eradicate embezzlement, especially with regard to the proliferation of disguised remuneration systems.

The CEO of the compliance organization, Crawford Temple, explained: [reform] has been deployed in the private sector, we have seen an increase in the number of entrepreneurs duped into R&D programs.

“HMRC is failing to shut down these programs fast enough. Hopefully this new appointment will lead to concerted and visible action.

“Funding for the Single Executing Agency is a huge step forward”

In line with Mr Temple’s hopes of something tangible soon, the single executing agency promised in June now has the money it needs, despite the lack of approval for the fall 2021 budget.

In fact, ReLegal says it has “received” a note from the Department of Business, Energy, Innovation and Skills that SEB is “funded”.

“This is a huge step forward for the protection of workers in general but, in particular for workers in the parent company,” the company said.

“Huge work”

Being potentially directly affected, given that it is an umbrella company, Orca Pay Group is impatient.

“[Margaret Beels has a] huge work on his hands, but it’s yet another positive step in the right direction for [regulation of] umbrella industry, ”says group CEO Rob Sharp.

“While this position has been vacant for much longer than anyone had hoped, this appointment could not come at a more critical time for the temporary job market. Good luck Marguerite.

“Distorted and disturbed due to IR35”

The Association of Self-Employed Professionals and Self-Employed Workers confirmed last night that the appointment of a new DLME was “long overdue”.

The association’s director of policy told ContractorUK: “The new director will have a lot to do, but we urge him to focus on two key issues: regulating umbrella companies and pushing the government to quit. ‘it clarifies the rules of employment status, as it pledged to do in 2018.

“Thousands of entrepreneurs have seen their professional lives distorted and disrupted by the changes to IR35 in the private sector. As a result, many now find themselves in unwanted relationships with umbrella companies. We need to ensure that these umbrellas are transparent and fair with their customers and that true independents who choose not to use umbrellas are not required to do so. “


Source link

]]>
OIG Updates Self-Disclosure Protocol | King and Spalding https://ifawpca.org/oig-updates-self-disclosure-protocol-king-and-spalding/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 18:54:50 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/oig-updates-self-disclosure-protocol-king-and-spalding/ On November 8, 2021, OIG released an update to the Self-Disclosure Protocol (SDP). The revised SDP includes a name change for the SDP, an increase in the minimum amounts required to pay under the SDP, a requirement that SDP submissions be made through the OIG website, and additional clarifications. The fundamentals of the SDP remain […]]]>

On November 8, 2021, OIG released an update to the Self-Disclosure Protocol (SDP). The revised SDP includes a name change for the SDP, an increase in the minimum amounts required to pay under the SDP, a requirement that SDP submissions be made through the OIG website, and additional clarifications. The fundamentals of the SDP remain unchanged, such as submission deadlines, submission content requirements, and damage calculation approaches.

The OIG first published the SDP in 1998. The SDP established a process for healthcare providers, providers, or other persons or entities subject to Civil Monetary Penalties (CMPs) to report and voluntarily resolve cases of potential fraud involving federal health programs. The SDP provides guidance on how to investigate a conduct, quantify damage, and report a conduct to the OIG to resolve liability under the OIG’s CMP authorities. Between 1998 and 2020, the OIG resolved over 2,200 disclosures. Prior to the November 2021 update, the SDP was last changed in 2013.

The November 2021 SDP update contains a number of changes, including the following:

  • The OIG renamed the OIG Supplier Self-Disclosure Protocol protocol to the OIG Healthcare Fraud Self-Disclosure Protocol. Likewise, the OIG changed the references in the SDP from “health care providers” to “persons”, which is now a defined term meaning an individual, a trust or estate, a partnership, a corporation, an association. professional or company, or other entity, public or private.

  • The OIG has increased the minimum settlement amounts for the SDP to match the statutory minimum penalty amounts. For bribe-related submissions accepted in the SDP, the OIG has increased its minimum settlement amount from $ 50,000 to $ 100,000. For all other matters accepted in the PLS, OIG has increased its minimum settlement amount from $ 10,000 to $ 20,000.

  • The OIG now requires that SDP disclosures be submitted through the OIG website. Disclosures by mail will no longer be accepted.

  • The OIG has not changed the methodology for calculating damages under the SDP. However, the OIG clarified that the damage estimate should identify the total estimated damage amount for each affected federal health program and the sum of the estimated damage for all affected federal health programs.

  • As in the previous version, the OIG reiterated that disclosing parties under Corporate Integrity Agreements (CIAs) can use the SDP. In the updated version, the OIG clarified that the disclosure should refer to the party being subject to a CIA, the disclosing party should send a copy of the disclosure to the disclosing party’s OIG controller, and the disclosures which are reportable events under the CIA must also be disclosed separately to the OIG.

  • The OIG also clarified that the SDP is not suited to disclosures more appropriately disclosed through the OIG Grants Self-Disclosure Program or the OIG Entrepreneur Self-Disclosure Program.

The updated SDP is available here.


Source link

]]>
Hart Island burials taken over by tree landscapers, uprooting families’ hopes for transformation https://ifawpca.org/hart-island-burials-taken-over-by-tree-landscapers-uprooting-families-hopes-for-transformation/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 13:33:41 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/hart-island-burials-taken-over-by-tree-landscapers-uprooting-families-hopes-for-transformation/ 20 November 2021 The city has brought in a landscaping company with no experience in managing cemeteries or public spaces to help turn Hart Island, the long neglected burial site of thousands of people killed by COVID, into a safe haven for the families and other visitors. The management contract worries both the leaders of […]]]>

20 November 2021

The city has brought in a landscaping company with no experience in managing cemeteries or public spaces to help turn Hart Island, the long neglected burial site of thousands of people killed by COVID, into a safe haven for the families and other visitors.

The management contract worries both the leaders of some of New York’s largest cemeteries and the families of those buried on Hart Island, concerned about the fate of city council’s $ 85 million vision to transform the field of the potter in the largest municipal cemetery in the country.

Meanwhile, the city’s parks service plans to keep a former Rikers Island captain who oversaw inmates carrying out emergency burials for pandemic victims in charge of burials.

“In order to restore public confidence, New York City should hire an experienced cemetery to oversee the management of Hart Island,” said Melinda Hunt, president and founder of the Hart Island Project.

Last month, the city’s social services department awarded a three-year, $ 33 million contract to JPL Industries, also known as J. Pizzirusso Landscaping Corp.

“Like visiting a prison”

The new contract coincided with a planned transfer of control of Hart Island – the burial site of more than one million New Yorkers killed by COVID, AIDS and more – from the Department of Corrections to the Department of Parks and Recreation .

This is a step taken by the city council, which in 2019 adopted a law ordering the transfer. The goal: to transform a largely dilapidated potter’s field dating back more than 150 years into a public and easily accessible cemetery.

Visiting the graves of loved ones has proven to be a hardship for people like Elsie Soto, who grew up in social housing in Lower Manhattan and now lives in the Bronx. Soto’s father, Norberto, died of complications from AIDS in the early 1990s, when she was 8 years old.

It took 24 years for Soto and his sister to reach his father’s grave for the first time. “It was very moving,” she said. “I felt like I was visiting a prison instead of visiting my father. I was standing right in the middle of an empty field. My father was not a prisoner and the others were not buried there and they shouldn’t be treated like that. “

David Fleming, the legislative director of the New York State Cemeteries Association, described Hart Island as having “enormous potential” but requiring “significant change” in operations to make it sustainable.

“I have spoken to many industry partners and visited the site and there is still a lot to be done to keep Hart Island running for a very long time including having good administration and technology. modern cemetery, ”said Fleming.

The first step, say those who work in the cemeteries, would be to hire a company experienced in record keeping, burial and exhumation – as well as the management of large public cemeteries and the treatment of visitors and members of family.

‘Knowledge and experience’

“Indefensible” was the word City Council Chairman Corey Johnson used in 2018 to describe extremely limited access and the rules prohibiting jail-type visitors who greeted those who attempted to visit the 130-acre island.

Now the champions of a more open Hart Island say they fear too little is on the way to change. In a presentation to bidders, the Department of Social Services said it was looking for “a qualified cemetery management and operating company or other similarly qualified contractor.”

The agency then awarded the contract to JPL Industries. As it did in an emergency at the height of the pandemic, when the bodies of COVID victims arrived by truck, JPL will continue to manage the remains of New York’s poor.

JPL Industries, contacted several times by phone and email, did not respond to requests for comment.

And while management has shifted to the parks department, the boss in charge of the burial grounds remains the same: Captain Martin F. Thompson, a career correctional officer, who oversaw the search work of Rikers inmates. Island on Hart Island since 2005..

“Captain Thompson’s knowledge and experience with Hart Island is unparalleled in New York City, developed and refined over decades of dedicated service on the island,” said Isaac McGinn, spokesperson for the Department of Human Services, in a press release.

But Hunt cited Thompson’s continued role as a warning sign.

“The purpose of passing a law was to end association with the criminal justice system. From a public relations perspective, putting the same person in charge … is unlikely to convince anyone that things have changed.” , said Hunt.

$ 85 million investment

About 1 in 10 New Yorkers who died from COVID-19 or pandemic-related causes in 2020 were ultimately buried on Hart Island, according to an analysis by Columbia University’s Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism and THE CITY based on city ​​data. The number of burials in 2020 was more than double that recorded in 2019.

Of the 3,200 people buried in 2020 and 2021 whose names and other identifying information have been made public, the median age has trended downward from 69 in 2020 to 66 in 2021.

This summer, the Buildings Ministry ordered the emergency demolition of 18 aging buildings on the island at an expected cost of $ 52 million, citing “public safety” – as part of a planned investment of $ 85 million. of dollars.

Soto last visited Hart Island in October and said he had received a nice “haircut”, with lawns mown and new benches.

But Hart Island is still difficult to visit.

It’s hard to get a spot on the twice-monthly visitor ferry, or even a reminder from the Department of Parks and Recreation. Only people with close ties to those buried there can request a visit and must sign a liability waiver. Ferries run out of bathrooms, and once there, the island can seem like a desolate place.

The operators of some of New York’s large private cemeteries declined to be named, but said they were relying on inexperienced contractors.

JPL Industries first worked on Hart Island during the height of the pandemic, when the Parks Department hired the company for $ 1.64 million on an emergency basis to bury thousands of COVID-19 victims in mass plots. His new three-year contract includes an option to renew for an additional three years.

The company, with dozens of active city contracts totaling at least $ 60 million, does not have a website. It’s also in the midst of a $ 1.3 million lawsuit against the city for hundreds of tree plantings in Brooklyn neighborhoods that the company says have been delayed or mismanaged by city officials.

“Selected on merit”

Executives from several cemetery companies invited to bid on the Hart Island contract called the process confusing and expressed amazement that a landscaping company won.

One executive said there were “so many underlying variables unanswered” – including key questions about the city’s staffing and future ferry service – that the company chose not to submit ‘offer.

Thousands of pages of supply-related documents, obtained as part of a New York Freedom of Information Act request by the Brown Institute for Media Innovation and Columbia’s MuckRock, detail the significant amount of work intended to ensure that Hart Island maintains its burial capacity – and becomes an “aesthetic and welcoming environment for visitors.”

The Department of Social Services said the procurement process won by J. Pizzirusso was competitive, evaluated and rated, with the contractor “selected on the merits”.

“Together, we look forward to continuing to reform the city’s end-of-life planning processes, with a focus on equity, inclusion and dignity for all, regardless of their background,” said McGinn .

Break in prison

Until the recent transition to parks, cemetery operations were an offshoot of neighboring Rikers Island, the town’s main prison complex. Thompson, the new executive director of operations at Hart Island Municipal Cemetery, is a longtime employee of the city jail who started with the Corrections Department in 1988 as a warden.

Thompson has a broad mandate, according to the job description of the post: as “chief adviser” to city leaders “on all matters relating to the operations of the cemetery on Hart Island”. At the Department of Corrections last year, he received a base salary of $ 109,000 and $ 62,400 in overtime and overtime pay.

But one thing has changed: Hart Island has ended its long-standing practice of using inmates to bury bodies. The parks department now has rangers on the island and says it is relaxing some restrictions, now allowing visitors to take photos of burial sites.

Board Member Ydanis Rodriguez (D-Manhattan) /Ben Fractenberg / THE CITY

Outgoing Council member Ydanis Rodriguez (D-Manhattan), who introduced legislation to make Hart Island accessible to the public in 2018, said the city needs to make sure changes are “done right.”

“While we would love to see Hart Island become the graveyard we all hoped it would become as soon as possible, we need to make sure that the process of repairing and transforming the island is transparent, respectful and professionally carried out. of the domain, “Rodriguez said in a statement.

This story, produced in collaboration with THE CITY and the Brown Institute for Media Innovation and MuckRock’s COVID-19 Documenting Project, is part of “MISSING THEM, THE CITY’s ongoing collaborative project to remember every New Yorker killed by COVID-19.


THE CITY is an independent, non-profit news organization dedicated to impactful reporting serving the people of New York City.


Source link

]]>
Sunalta camp fire damages mural, residents voice concerns https://ifawpca.org/sunalta-camp-fire-damages-mural-residents-voice-concerns/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 22:04:27 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/sunalta-camp-fire-damages-mural-residents-voice-concerns/ CALGARY – Residents living in the southwestern community of Sunalta have been busy cleaning up after a camp fire damaged a mural and the outdoor garden next door. The blaze, started by a small group of vulnerable Calgarians trying to warm up, spread to the Sunalta Wildflower Garden on November 10. The mural, the garage […]]]>

CALGARY –

Residents living in the southwestern community of Sunalta have been busy cleaning up after a camp fire damaged a mural and the outdoor garden next door.

The blaze, started by a small group of vulnerable Calgarians trying to warm up, spread to the Sunalta Wildflower Garden on November 10. The mural, the garage it was painted on, a nearby bench, and a storage bin were all damaged by the flames.

Jordan Hamilton, who lives nearby, saw the fire from his room around 12:30 am.

“We had to call 911 and we checked. It was shocking to see the amount of smoke hitting the community, ”he said.

“It’s never safe for people to sleep outside – not only will they hurt themselves, but they won’t get the help they deserve – so I encourage everyone, if they see someone sleeping outside, connecting them to social services. ”

Local artist Sarah Slaughter, who painted the mural, says it took hours to clean up the mess from the wall, but inevitably the room will have to be repainted next spring.

The mural was inspired by the area where Sunalta was built in the early 1900s and this history of its town planning.

“My initial reaction was just a shock, you go ‘oh no’ and there are a lot of people in the community contributing to this space so I found it heartbreaking,” Slaughter said.

“It’s a good reminder now of the importance of resources for the vulnerable and the homeless. “

The news is of particular concern to the Sunalta Community Association.

Executive Director Jenn Balderston says the gathering space is enjoyed by many neighbors on a daily basis.

“The fire at our Wildflower Community Garden Camp was a terrible accident that rocked our community as we mourn our beloved mural and (the) damage to our community garden,” she said.

“There was such a surge of support from residents who volunteered and from several city departments who offered to help. “

Balderston added that people passing through Sunalta are struggling financially and the community is working closely with various City of Calgary resources and nonprofit agencies to support them.

“We are extremely grateful to everyone who offered to lend a helping hand last week and into the future as we continue to navigate the complex social issues facing our community and our city,” he said. she declared.

In a statement to CTV News, the City of Calgary confirmed that Calgary police and the camp crew responded to the blaze on November 10.

“Procedures were followed and on that day it was determined that City of Calgary contractors would be advised to clean up the burnt out camp accordingly,” the statement said.

“It appears that there was an unfortunate administrative error on the part of our subcontractors which caused the cleaning crew not to show up on time as they went to an incorrect location and believed the job was finished. “

The city adds that it is following up with its contractor and continues to tackle the problem.

GREATER SUPPORT NEEDED FOR THE HOMELESS POPULATION

In a statement to CTV News, Ward 8 Coun. Courtney Walcott says he feels for the Sunalta Community Association as well as its residents, adding that he is committed to working with city departments and community partners to provide support.

“It was a very unfortunate accident and underscores the long-standing need for an expanded network of care for people with homelessness and other vulnerabilities,” Walcott said.

“The Sunalta community association, residents and municipal services were responsive for the cleanup and follow-up after the event. The Ward 8 office has been in daily contact with the Sunalta community association and municipal service partners, and is working to provide improved coordinated responses to prevent something like this from happening again.

Shaundra Bruvall, communications manager at Alpha House, explains that the nonprofit camp team is working on quick housing initiatives to help Calgarians sleeping rough.

She says camps are appearing more frequently due to colder temperatures and the COVID-19 pandemic which has limited space in shelters.

“We try to reduce travel to the camps as much as possible, as this makes it easier for our team to connect with people on a regular basis and to check in, to do welfare checks, to provide services and we encourage everyone if they see a camp to call our team, ”said Bruvall.

“We are doing our best to get people into the shelter where possible so that they are maybe a little bit protected from some of these more extreme days when we see exposure to the elements as a bigger problem. important.”

Bruvall adds that Alpha House is also in the process of collecting winter jackets and warm clothing right now so its outreach teams can meet the basic needs of people living outside.

The Alpha House Camp team can be reached at 403-805-7388.


Source link

]]>
CFLCA Agricultural Work Forum November 17 https://ifawpca.org/cflca-agricultural-work-forum-november-17/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:03:51 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/cflca-agricultural-work-forum-november-17/ CFLCA Agricultural Work Forum November 17 Mike Stephens Journalist For California Ag Today I’m Mike Stephens The California Farm Labor Contractor Association (CFLCA) is hosting its 11th Annual Farm Labor Forum in a virtual format on November 17-18. Agricultural labor contractors, supervisors, producers, agricultural human resource professionals, safety managers and affiliated agricultural labor industry representatives […]]]>

CFLCA Agricultural Work Forum November 17

Mike Stephens
Journalist

For California Ag Today I’m Mike Stephens

The California Farm Labor Contractor Association (CFLCA) is hosting its 11th Annual Farm Labor Forum in a virtual format on November 17-18.

Agricultural labor contractors, supervisors, producers, agricultural human resource professionals, safety managers and affiliated agricultural labor industry representatives are invited to attend. Participants will gain the knowledge and tools to be successful, compliant and profitable in the agricultural labor industry. Sessions are available in English and Spanish.

Over 30 educational courses from top-notch instructors highlight key information, strategies and solutions. Keynote speakers are Curt Covington, senior director of institutional lending at AgAmerica, forecasting the future of California agriculture, and Craig Regelbrugge, senior vice president of AmericanHort, discussing whether good agricultural labor policy is good for politics. Other topics in the session include Cal / OSHA updates, 2022 law and regulation preparation, federal and state licensing issues, and operations management solutions.

Additional information, including registration and sponsorship options, can be found by visiting the ACFL website at www.calflca.org or calling 916-389-1246.


Source link

]]>
Men’s golf engages Daniel Heo and Nathan Wang for 2022 signing class https://ifawpca.org/mens-golf-engages-daniel-heo-and-nathan-wang-for-2022-signing-class/ https://ifawpca.org/mens-golf-engages-daniel-heo-and-nathan-wang-for-2022-signing-class/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 00:01:56 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/mens-golf-engages-daniel-heo-and-nathan-wang-for-2022-signing-class/ MGOLF11/10/2021 15:34 | By: Cal Athletics Bears bolster list with additions from Heo and Wang on national signing day BERKELEY – California Men’s Golf has signed a pair of incoming freshmen in its 2022 signing class to Daniel Heo and Nathan Wang. Two highly regarded recruits, Heo and Wang are ranked in the top 25 […]]]>

Bears bolster list with additions from Heo and Wang on national signing day

BERKELEY – California Men’s Golf has signed a pair of incoming freshmen in its 2022 signing class to Daniel Heo and Nathan Wang. Two highly regarded recruits, Heo and Wang are ranked in the top 25 of the California recruiting class.

“We are fortunate to sign Daniel Heo and Nathan Wang”, Alex and Marie Shipman Director of Men’s Golf Walter Chun noted. “Both young men demonstrate a desire to play golf at the highest level and get a great education. Their personalities also match the culture of the team, so they are a perfect fit for Cal’s men’s golf program.”

A 6 foot tall senior at Cypress High School (CHS) in Cypress, Calif., Daniel Heo is from Seoul, South Korea. During his time at the CHS, Heo racked up a number of accolades, including the Rolex Scholastic Junior All-America Honors in 2021. Named his team’s Most Valuable Player (MVP), he led his high school to third place of the Empire State League in 2019. and ultimately set the school record with an average of 70.0 strokes. Heo ranked 59th in the American Junior Golf Association (AJGA) rankings and he is currently ranked 17th in the 2022 signing class in California.

An athlete in two sports in baseball and golf, Heo also excelled in class, receiving an Academic Honors award for having a minimum grade point average of 3.5 on 16 AG courses.

Heo is the son of Suyeon Jo (mother) and Jibaek Heo (father); Heo’s father graduated from Korea with a business degree.

“I am thrilled to be playing golf at Cal because of the many strong tournaments I will be able to participate in that will help me improve both on and off the course,” said Heo. “Not only that, but I believe the coaches will help me improve and feel comfortable getting used to college golf.”

“Daniel has steadily improved over the years,” Chun said. “It shows how hard he is working on his game and his passion for the sport. There is no doubt that he will continue to make progress, and it will be fun to see his progress.”

The Bears’ second recruit is Nathan Wang, a resident of Fremont, Calif., And Archbishop Mitty High School. Wang was the first freshman to win the West Catholic Athletic League (WCAL) MVP award, winning the honor in 2019. Most recently, he qualified for the 2021 United States Junior Amateur Championship and has led his high school team to a second place at regional in 2020. Standing 6 feet tall, Wang has finished in the top 15 several times over the past year, including winning the AJGA Junior at Peach Tree, an 11th place at the Jack Burke Junior Invitational and a 7th place at the AJGA Callaway Junior Championship. The three-time All-WCAL first-team member tournament low was 62 (-10) in the AJGA Junior final round at Peach Tree, a tournament he won hands down at 19 strokes below par (68, 67, 62). Wang reached 17th place on the junior golf scoreboard (September 2020) and is currently ranked sixth in the 2022 signing class in California.

Like Heo, Wang also played baseball at the same time as he was on the golf team and performed well in the classroom as a member of Archbishop Mitty’s Honor Roll for four years.

Wang’s father (Wilson) is an independent entrepreneur while his mother (Sherry) graduated from Peking University with a master’s degree and is currently a financial advisor.

“I am very excited to play golf at Cal because I love the environment around the team,” said Wang. “The school, the coaches, the teammates and the program are all really amazing; they foster an atmosphere of growth and competitiveness. I believe Berkeley gives you all the resources you need to be successful. to go out and work. “

“Nathan’s enthusiasm, talent and work ethic are attributes that are hard to come by,” said Chun. “But once found in a rookie like Nathan, we have to do everything we can to sign him.”

To follow Cal’s men’s golf this season, visit CalBears.com, or follow the team on Twitter, and Instagram.



Source link

]]>
https://ifawpca.org/mens-golf-engages-daniel-heo-and-nathan-wang-for-2022-signing-class/feed/ 0
School bus safety laws signed by Murphy, boosted by APP investigation https://ifawpca.org/school-bus-safety-laws-signed-by-murphy-boosted-by-app-investigation/ https://ifawpca.org/school-bus-safety-laws-signed-by-murphy-boosted-by-app-investigation/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 10:00:59 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/school-bus-safety-laws-signed-by-murphy-boosted-by-app-investigation/ TRENTON – Pair of bills signed Monday will fill some of the gaps identified in an award-winning Asbury Park Press and USA TODAY NETWORK investigation into the ‘rogue operators’ of the private school bus industry who routinely put children at risk without penalty. Gov. Phil Murphy signed Bill A-5818 on Monday, which will publicly identify […]]]>

TRENTON – Pair of bills signed Monday will fill some of the gaps identified in an award-winning Asbury Park Press and USA TODAY NETWORK investigation into the ‘rogue operators’ of the private school bus industry who routinely put children at risk without penalty.

Gov. Phil Murphy signed Bill A-5818 on Monday, which will publicly identify the owners of a previously banned school bus contractor and prohibit school boards from awarding contracts to them. Grounds for delisting include violating state law, hiring ineligible or disqualified drivers, or not performing satisfactorily.

The second bill, A-5817, increases the fines for school bus contractors who put unqualified drivers behind the wheel of a school bus, up to a fine of $ 15,000 for the third offense and offenses following. The state’s previous law only covered unqualified commercial drivers, including truck drivers. The fines provided for in A-5817 apply specifically to school bus drivers.

The bill also clarifies that a contractor cannot unknowingly claim to have broken the law in order to avoid paying the fine.

Related: New bills would fill dangerous loopholes in the school bus industry

Both bills passed unanimously by the New Jersey State Senate and General Assembly in June. They were mainly sponsored by the Senses. Joseph Lagana, D-Bergen, and Patrick Diegnan, D-Middlesex, and Assembly members Dan Benson, D-Mercer, Lisa Swain and Chris Tully, D-Bergen.

In October 2020, the USA TODAY NETWORK Atlantic Group released a survey detailing loopholes in incorporation, inspection and government procurement laws that allow dubious operators to bypass laws aimed at keeping children safe in homes. school buses.

SUBSCRIBERS ONLY: Read the full survey here!

The investigation showed how some private school bus operators openly flouted state law and, on the rare occasions when they faced significant penalties, simply transferred ownership to one spouse or another. family member or changed the company name and went on to earn millions in taxpayer funded contracts. .

The project received the 2020 Lloyd P. Burns Award for Public Service as part of the New Jersey Press Association’s annual awards competition.

Two days after the network released its investigation, the New Jersey attorney general’s office charged the owners of F&A Transportation – one of the contractors highlighted in the investigation – with theft by deception and contract fraud for allegedly hiring unqualified bus drivers and failing to perform background checks. .

The owners, Ahmed Mahgoub and Faiza Ibrahim, were charged in September 2021.

The legislative package adopted on Monday only partially addresses the countless shortcomings identified by the Network. A third bill would create the post of school bus safety ombudsman within the Ministry of Education, responsible for “coordinating enforcement and accountability” between public bodies responsible for student transportation, such as the Motor Vehicle Commission, DOE and Police Departments.

This bill, also sponsored by Diegnan, Lagana, Benson, Swain and Tully, was never passed in the Senate or the Assembly.

Mike Davis has spent the last decade covering local New Jersey news, marijuana legalization, transportation, and a bit of everything in between. He has won a few awards that make his parents very proud. Contact him at mdavis@gannettnj.com or @byMikeDavis on Twitter.



Source link

]]>
https://ifawpca.org/school-bus-safety-laws-signed-by-murphy-boosted-by-app-investigation/feed/ 0