Contractor Association – IFAWPCA http://ifawpca.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:30:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ifawpca.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Contractor Association – IFAWPCA http://ifawpca.org/ 32 32 Lincoln plumber’s widow and vet clinic agree to $3 million settlement for wrongful death lawsuit https://ifawpca.org/lincoln-plumbers-widow-and-vet-clinic-agree-to-3-million-settlement-for-wrongful-death-lawsuit/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/lincoln-plumbers-widow-and-vet-clinic-agree-to-3-million-settlement-for-wrongful-death-lawsuit/ A Lincoln veterinary clinic and its owner have agreed to pay $3 million to settle a wrongful death case filed by the widow of a man killed after being crushed in a partial ceiling collapse in 2019. In the 2020 lawsuit filed in Lancaster County District Court, Ryan Kizzier’s widow, Dana Kizzier, alleged that the […]]]>

A Lincoln veterinary clinic and its owner have agreed to pay $3 million to settle a wrongful death case filed by the widow of a man killed after being crushed in a partial ceiling collapse in 2019.

In the 2020 lawsuit filed in Lancaster County District Court, Ryan Kizzier’s widow, Dana Kizzier, alleged that the Nebraska Animal Medical Center at 56th Street and Old Cheney Road and the negligence of Forney Properties LLC led to Kizzier’s death six days later.

He was the 40-year-old father of two young boys.

The lawsuit alleged that prior to July 15, 2019, the clinic dangerously used and overloaded the area above the ceiling of its first-floor dog kennels with heavy shelving and storage.

After a water main broke and the ceiling began to sag, staff were able to stop the flow of water. Kizzier’s attorney, Eric Brown, said Nebraska Animal Medical Center and Forney Properties were told structural changes to the first floor kennels were needed to safely repair the pipe and did not make the changes. nor contacted a structural engineer about it.

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Instead, he said, they contacted Ryan Kizzier, owner of Lincoln Plumbing, to fix it and restore water to the kennels.

When Kizzier arrived and began working on the pipe, the first floor ceiling collapsed on top of him.

Rescue teams were able to free him using airbags, but Kizzier later died in a hospital.

In its response to the lawsuit, NAMC denied any knowledge of pre-existing structural issues and said only Kizzier made the decision to review the ceiling, “which suddenly and unexpectedly collapsed through no fault of the defendants. “.

But Brown said he subpoenaed documents and learned that another local contractor had maintained the kennel area two months before the collapse and said it appeared structurally unsound. The plumber reportedly expressed concerns “about whether it was safe for employees and dogs to use this area”.

After the collapse, NAMC was sold. Although manager Adam Forney is still working on it.

The parties reached an agreement during mediation in October. Earlier this month, the Lancaster County Court approved the settlement as required by law and guardianships have been put in place for the surviving minor children of Kizzier.

According to court records, one-third of the settlement will go toward attorney fees, and Dana Kizzier and her sons will receive the remainder, $1,984,000.

Brown said the attorneys are relieved for the family, “as this will allow them to continue to heal and hopefully provide some measure of closure.”

He called Ryan Kizzier’s death tragic and completely preventable.

“A woman lost a husband and two boys senselessly lost their fathers because a company was more concerned with reopening its water to start using the kennels again for profit than the safety of the people working in this area, including their own. employees. There was no excuse,” the attorney said.

Attorney Dan Ketcham, who represents NAMC and Forney Properties, did not respond to a request for comment.

The Blue Angels traveled to Lincoln on Monday to kick off the official planning process for the Liberty Guardians air show scheduled for August 26-27 at Lincoln Airport.

Matt Olberding


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As mental health issues in schools soar, provider withdraws from South West districts https://ifawpca.org/as-mental-health-issues-in-schools-soar-provider-withdraws-from-south-west-districts/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:06:11 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/as-mental-health-issues-in-schools-soar-provider-withdraws-from-south-west-districts/ Several school districts in southwestern Virginia have less than a month before losing a key provider of mental health services, who cite changes in how the state handles the provision of such services as a reason for stepping down. . Family Preservation Services announced in an Oct. 27 letter that it would stop providing daytime […]]]>

Several school districts in southwestern Virginia have less than a month before losing a key provider of mental health services, who cite changes in how the state handles the provision of such services as a reason for stepping down. .

Family Preservation Services announced in an Oct. 27 letter that it would stop providing daytime therapeutic treatment services — school-based services for children enrolled in Medicaid to treat behavioral, emotional and mental health issues — for children and adolescents on December 12 due to “procedural and fiscal challenges.

“For years, the FPS and other providers of (daytime therapeutic treatment), including our local community service boards/behavioral health authorities, have advocated for the TDT to be reviewed and updated by (the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services) to reflect a service that more closely aligns with our inclusive education system today,” Andy Kitzmiller, state director of Family Preservation Services, wrote in the October letter. “However, these changes have not been made, nor does it appear that they will be in the near future.”

The Roanoke-based provider has been in business for more than 20 years and serves 11 communities, including Wise, Dickenson and Buchanan counties and the town of Norton.

State researchers reported less than a month ago that student behavior and mental health issues in schools have skyrocketed since the pandemic.

Superintendent of Norton City Schools Gina Wohlford said after the loss of duty officers caring for pupils with behavioral problems last year she is concerned about her ability to get enough of health workers for the next semester.

“A lot of workers have been the same workers who have really developed strong relationships with our students, so I’m really concerned,” Wohlford said.

Care protocol

In recent years, the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services, which administers the federal Medicaid program in Virginia, has begun to integrate mental health services into a managed care system.

Previously, mental health providers submitted a record of their services to Medicaid for reimbursement. Now, they must first request permission to provide the service from the managed care organization.

Christina Nuckols, spokeswoman for DMAS, said the move helped avoid confusion and gaps in coordination when individuals received some services under a managed health care plan and others through on a fee-for-service basis.

But since the agency’s decision, the number of people on therapeutic day hospitalization has fallen, falling 81% from 2019 to 2021, according to data of DMAS. A total of 19,303 members received such services in 2019, compared to 3,633 in 2021.

A chart showing day therapy treatment expenditures over the past five years statewide. (Data courtesy of Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services)

Mindy Carlin, executive director of the Virginia Association of Community-Based Providers, said that since Virginia’s change in 2019, managed care organizations have become much more “rigid” about allowing day therapy treatment.

However, Carlin said at the same time, the way schools treat children with serious mental illness has also changed since regulations and reimbursement rates were first established.

Day therapy treatment and reimbursement rates were designed to serve groups, Carlin said — but schools no longer segregate students with behavioral issues, which means providers often have to work with individuals.

“The rates don’t even come close to being enough to cover the cost of providing the service which may be direct to a child, and so it’s not financially feasible,” Carlin said.

Family Preservation Services is working with school divisions affected by its decision on other ways to meet the needs of students, according to spokesperson Kyle McMahon.

The supplier is not alone. Carlin said Intercept Health, one of the largest private providers of student mental health services in Virginia, no longer offers daytime therapeutic treatment. An employee who answered the phone at Intercept confirmed late Friday that the provider was no longer offering the service, but the manager did not respond to a request for comment.

The agency requests a review

In early fall, DMAS demand $850,000 to find a contractor to assess costs related to ongoing and necessary changes to Medicaid behavioral services.

As part of its application, the agency is asking for a review of the state’s daytime therapy treatment services, saying it has “problematic pricing and a unit structure that has made it impossible for providers to provide the service”.

“The service was designed before young people with serious emotional problems were integrated out of self-contained classrooms,” the agency wrote. Additionally, “the service is designed as a group service, but the structure of the school day makes this method of delivery almost impossible and therefore providers must provide it as an individual service. This service needs to be redesigned as evidence-based school services with appropriate pricing and fee structure.

The agency is calling for an overhaul of services to a more evidence-based program “with an appropriate rate and fee structure.”

“Our system is under unprecedented pressure due to the impacts of the pandemic on behavioral health staff which have led to attrition and burnout and the cascading effects of our ongoing psychiatric crisis and the epidemic. addiction,” the agency wrote.

Carlin said she was glad to see DMAS making the requests, but worried the process might take too long, especially for children with high needs.

“It worries me because you’re going to see the trends continue with more and more suicide attempts and more kids in the ER for mental health reasons,” Carlin said.

“The sheer volume of mental health needs”

Keith Perrigan, superintendent of Bristol Virginia Public Schools, said schools in southwestern Virginia are facing a crisis in mental health services and have used federal COVID-19 response funds to fill the gaps.

However, these one-time funds will soon run out.

The Joint Audit and Legislative Review Commission, in a study of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on education, recently found that school staff viewed student behavior as the most serious issue facing teachers. divisions faced when returning to in-person learning. Most students “feel jittery, anxious, or jittery,” JLARC noted.

Perrigan said staff at Bristol have noticed an increase in students’ behavioral and mental health.

“But seeing the sheer volume of mental health needs across the Commonwealth, I think was an eye opener,” he said.

JLARC recommended that lawmakers provide divisions with funding for training on behavioral issues and classroom management. They also suggested that the General Assembly consider amending state law to clearly define “direct school counseling” to help reduce the time counselors spend on non-counselling activities and to allow psychologists qualified and licensed in other fields to obtain a provisional license.

School psychologist positions have some of the highest vacancy rates among all vacancies in Virginia.

“Unfortunately, it’s not just a school issue, it’s a community issue,” Perrigan said. “And whether you’re talking to law enforcement, teachers, or healthcare providers, mental health may be the biggest challenge we’re facing right now. And we have to find a way to start filling those holes and closing the gap.

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A look behind the scenes: removing the dam from the Van Reed paper mill https://ifawpca.org/a-look-behind-the-scenes-removing-the-dam-from-the-van-reed-paper-mill/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:01:20 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/a-look-behind-the-scenes-removing-the-dam-from-the-van-reed-paper-mill/ Director, River Restoration Sometimes the threads of our project work loop in seemingly random, but sometimes beneficial or surprising ways. The story of the Van Reed Paper Mill Dam Removal Project began over 10 years ago and two staff coordinators on Cacoosing Creek in Reading, Pennsylvania. But in some ways it started in the 1800s […]]]>

Sometimes the threads of our project work loop in seemingly random, but sometimes beneficial or surprising ways.

The story of the Van Reed Paper Mill Dam Removal Project began over 10 years ago and two staff coordinators on Cacoosing Creek in Reading, Pennsylvania. But in some ways it started in the 1800s when the mill was running at full speed.

The problem with dam removal projects is that you don’t always know what the path from start to finish will look like. From here to there, this path can be interesting, frustrating, exciting, challenging, instructive and so many other things that make this job so fulfilling. The journey isn’t wasted (although sometimes you wish you didn’t have to take a certain meander).

So the trip.

Stationery roadblock before removal
Stationery roadblock before removal

There he sat in 2019. Paper Mill Dam. A remnant of a bygone era. Already at least seven years of project history behind (we will come back to this). The permit package had been submitted, but there were UNANSWERED QUESTIONS about the design. Nobody wants to deal with it. So procrastination sets in. And that’s how I took up this project. Just do it. Easier said than… well, you know.

I get the answers. We get the permits. Someone else has already done the fundraising. So we just removed the suction cup, right? Bad. There I was, rolling along – hired a construction contractor (Flyway Excavating) and a construction supervision engineer (Kleinschmidt). I have a baby (awwww). I’m back from maternity leave ready to get to work. We all go to the pre-construction meeting to go over the plan before construction begins and representatives from the neighboring homeowners association (HOA) show up on the scene. We had planned to dispose of the dam materials in an existing open concrete pond across the river from the plant. The owner of the dam, Rob Marella, had an agreement with a builder to be able to use this bank along the river. The HOA did not want to join this agreement. See, these are the crazy things that happen when projects take so many years to complete.

I will come back a little further in the story to explain why it took so long to get to this point. It wasn’t just the UNANSWERED QUESTIONS. You see, when they built the neighborhood on the other side of the river, the owner of the dam allowed them to install a natural gas line upstream in exchange for his use of the opposite bank downstream. When conversations began about removing the dam, it took a lot of negotiation (i.e. years) with the natural gas company to reach an agreement on the design approach at the end upper part of the retention basin where the gas line was located. . We thought it was all sorted, then LOOP here, it’s back with the HOA.

So we had contingency funding in place, but as costs increase over time, it wasn’t enough to cover a change in the design plan to transport an unforeseen amount of material offsite. So the project is put on hold. No construction for me in 2019.

We are going through a period of problem solving – what are our options for getting rid of this hardware? Where can we get additional project funding? (As it turns out, fundraising for this project wasn’t easy at first. Many thanks to our loyal partners at the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection for their contributions to the project.) to plan. It ultimately doesn’t work.

It took a while, but luckily, with the support of our amazing local partner, Berks Nature, we were able to secure additional funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Delaware River Program. Whew! Alright, we can get back on the road. However, our access point still goes through the HOA property. No problem, they told us it wouldn’t be a problem as long as we found another disposal option. So I go back to the HOA. Crickets. During months. And months.

That’s why you need good partners and entrepreneurs. Flyway told me they would figure out how to get to the “hard side” dam. They did too.

Construction beings on Paper Mill Dam

Finally, June 2022, construction begins. I can’t even afford to celebrate. I wait for the other shoe to drop. (Other people: “Are you excited?” Me: “Maybe? “.) At American Rivers, we share “WOO HOO” among our staff. I can’t WOO HOO yet.

Much of the dam is removed. Now, this project has been enabled with a passive sediment management approach, which means everyone anticipated that a volume of sediment would be released. These rivers in the central PA move a lot of sediment. They are dynamic. Dams trap sediment, then some of it flows out during major storms. They are not a permanent storage solution. And the volume discharged at this site can be treated by the river downstream. But the general public is often unaware of all these dynamics.

In the meantime, I’m having conversations with Amy Kober who leads our communications team and our partners at Berks Nature about when and how we should share news of the dam removal with the press. (Turns out Amy has a fascinating history with this barrage in a surprising LOOP that goes back generations. Check out her story in The Revelator.

Y’all, the shoe is falling. Or the YouTube video, as it turns out.

From a worried fisherman. Not that I blame him. Awareness of the project was done years before it actually happened (due to delays). Anyway, someone saw sediment coming down the river and got mad and made a video about it.

Work continues for the removal of the paper mill dam

The video begins to fly through the dam demolition community in Pennsylvania. The PA Department of Environmental Protection is not happy. We need to initiate a change of plans. The ghosts of the Kehm Dam project come back to haunt me.

We can’t let all that sediment go downstream. What are we going to do about it? Enable problem-solving mode. Bring the brains together – the engineers from Inter-Fluve (the original designer), Kleinschmidt (the construction monitoring company), Flyway Excavating (the developers) and me (oy…).

We discuss the possible options on the site. Turns out the extra fundraising I did will come in handy (those lemons turn into lemonade when you least expect it). We are developing an action plan. We decide to transport some of the sediment off-site. We employ additional erosion protection measures along the shoreline. We are adjusting some of our other previous plans that no longer seem to make sense for the site. We find bedrock (yay! We love bedrock. Very stable.).

Sediment removal on Cacosing Stream for paper mill dam removal

One more obstacle, however. There is a closure window for in-stream work that begins October 1. It’s almost October 1st. We are contacting the PA Fish and Boat Commission and requesting a waiver to work in October. The Commission agrees that it would be better to do additional work now rather than wait until next year as it is early in the closure window and the impact on fish should be minimal compared to the benefits, it grants therefore the derogation. (Phew!)

October 17. The second phase of construction work is complete. The site is progressing well. The river is adjusting to its new normal as we expect. Unfortunately I can’t see the finished product yet because I have a back problem. That’s why it’s good to have good entrepreneurs.

So we finally succeeded. It still looks rough, but once filled with plants it will be a nice free flowing stream again.

Cacoosing Creek is flowing freely again after the removal of the Paper Mill Dam!

By the way, the owner of the dam, Rob Marella, has been very patient over these many years. For that, I am grateful. I hope to see his vision for a revitalized mill restaurant come to fruition.

We now see what will happen over the next few months and we will meet again in 2023 to see if more work needs to be done.

Lessons learned

While I learned a lot from this project, I want to highlight a few key lessons learned:

  1. Always plan for the unexpected. You never know what unforeseen issues might arise, so build contingency funding into your grant proposals. The costs are also constantly increasing, so this is essential. Then, when the unexpected happens, don’t panic. Just start looking at your options for overcoming the obstacle.
  1. Have a confident project team. Being able to trust your team in times of challenge really helps alleviate anxiety and stress. You are not an island and you do not need to know everything to manage a dam demolition project. Good leaders know what they don’t know and find people who do.
  1. Community awareness is essential. People are more comfortable when they can put a face to a project. Ultimately, being aware of community concerns will allow you to prepare accordingly, even if you cannot avoid opposition to the project.
  1. Do not abandon. Sometimes these projects can take a long time to go from concept to reality. It is important to keep jumping over and through obstacles. It needs patience.
  1. Sediments are one thing. There are a myriad of opinions about sediment in rivers and what is good/bad/negligible. For better or worse, Pennsylvania is on the hot seat in the Chesapeake Bay region (and to a lesser extent the Delaware River) for sediment-related issues. If there is sediment behind a dam, which is the case in many cases in this region, it will be necessary to discuss how to manage it.

It was a wild ride. More than anything, I appreciate the good partners we have who help us do this work. A strong team is essential. Without them, this wouldn’t happen.

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Renovation Boom Continues Even as Project Costs Rise and Interest Rates Rise https://ifawpca.org/renovation-boom-continues-even-as-project-costs-rise-and-interest-rates-rise/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 16:20:00 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/renovation-boom-continues-even-as-project-costs-rise-and-interest-rates-rise/ Susan Lambertis is having her whole house renovated and hopes it will be finished early next year. “We’re in a knee-deep renovation,” she said. After reviewing plans with an architect last year, securing necessary approvals and some pandemic-related delays, the project officially kicked off last spring. Lambert said she and her husband were motivated to […]]]>

Susan Lambertis is having her whole house renovated and hopes it will be finished early next year.

“We’re in a knee-deep renovation,” she said.

After reviewing plans with an architect last year, securing necessary approvals and some pandemic-related delays, the project officially kicked off last spring.

Lambert said she and her husband were motivated to upgrade their home after realizing many small repairs were needed.

“We needed new windows, we needed a new roof. Our kitchen was falling apart – cabinets were all broken, our fridge was broken, our stove. So we kind of needed to do a bunch of things,” she said.

The renovation industry really boomed in the first two years of the pandemic as people spent more time at home, and that momentum has continued despite higher costs and rising interest rates .

Dave Kenney, who runs BroLaws Construction with his brother-in-law, said a kitchen remodel could cost between $15,000 and $20,000 more than just a few years ago.

“A job two years ago and a job now are not comparable, which is a bit difficult as a business owner when you get callbacks for other jobs that people have used you for before,” did he declare.

Jordy Fagan, co-founder of Toronto-based interior design firm Collective Studio, said projects are more expensive overall right now, which she attributes in large part to labor costs. She said prices for materials, such as wood, have stabilized somewhat from the sharp swings of the past two years, but still remain above pre-pandemic levels.

“It’s easier to give a quote now, and not be like, ‘OK, this quote is only good for five days, because anything can happen in five days.’ At least now it’s a bit more stable, and it’s a bit more comfortable to dive into a renovation,” she said.

Coming out of the first lockdown, Collective Studio saw demand skyrocket in the summer of 2020.

“That summer felt a bit more normal even though we were pre-vaccinated. I feel like that sparked interest in getting ready for the next wave of fall in terms of setting up work-from-home situations and understanding that kids wouldn’t necessarily be going back to school in September,” Fagan said.

“The volume started to get incredibly big, which was amazing.”

Fast forward to 2022 and declining consumer confidence has impacted some of that volume, but the demand is still there, Fagan said.

“I think people have saved money now,” she said.

Meanwhile, BroLaws’ Kenney said one of the challenges of the past two years has been with the quality of the workforce, especially as demand remains high and workers are stretched.

He said his company works to create interest in the trades and give young people the right training and experience.

“I think we need more advocates or people who can show that trades can be a good place to work and that you can be as successful as any other job,” he said. .

Kenney added that he had increased the wages of his employees as the cost of living rose and he had therefore raised prices in order to maintain this.

In September, the average hourly wage of construction workers rose 7.5% year over year, an increase of $2.36 to $33.79, according to Statistics Canada.

While Kenney was able to keep up with demand, he said getting projects 100% was always a problem, sometimes due to persistent delays.

“So we finished a kitchen, for example, but they didn’t have their stove for another two months because the stove was out of stock and their shipment was delayed,” he said. “Or we have completed other projects and were waiting for a counter that is now out of stock just because of overseas demand.

Homeowners spent an average of about $13,000 between March 2021 and February 2022 to renovate the interior of their homes, while an average of $6,600 was spent on exterior projects, according to company data from HomeStars home improvement.

HomeStars also found that homeowners expect to spend an average of more than $25,000 on home renovations from March 2022 to February 2023.

So what did people ask for this year? Dedicated child labor spaces, home offices and entertainment spaces, Fagan said.

Kenney said there were also a lot of requests for kitchen overhauls, outdoor projects and indoor air quality improvements.

Looking ahead to 2023, some industry experts say there could be a bit of a cooldown on the way.

Kevin Lee, CEO of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, has already seen a slight slowdown in demand in the second half of 2022.

“A lot of people, when they’re doing particularly large renovations, finance them through things like their lines of credit. So while the cost of borrowing is rising as quickly as it has, many people are now postponing some of their renovations,” he said.

However, RénoAssistance, a general contracting company that is part of Desjardins, sees the renovation market remaining strong next year.

Indeed, more and more homeowners are choosing to stay in their current property and improve it rather than trying to find a new property in a declining housing market, he said.

Lambert said the renovation process has been stressful, as she and her husband balance mortgage payments, rent and financing the renovation itself, but noted that having a good contractor and architect made a big difference.

“I went in expecting it to be, of course, the most stressful thing we’ve done. That’s what everyone says. I feel like we’re doing pretty well. »

Adena Ali, The Canadian Press

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Breaking News: Tiger Paw Wins Top Design Award https://ifawpca.org/breaking-news-tiger-paw-wins-top-design-award/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 02:48:37 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/breaking-news-tiger-paw-wins-top-design-award/ The professionals behind the Ozark School District’s Tiger Paw Early Childhood Center have won the Springfield Contractors Association’s Design Team of the Year award. The award was presented at the 38th Annual Salute to Design and Construction Awards Banquet, held tonight at the Oasis Convention Center. Lead architect for the Tiger Paw project, Melissa Higbie […]]]>

The professionals behind the Ozark School District’s Tiger Paw Early Childhood Center have won the Springfield Contractors Association’s Design Team of the Year award.

The award was presented at the 38th Annual Salute to Design and Construction Awards Banquet, held tonight at the Oasis Convention Center.

Lead architect for the Tiger Paw project, Melissa Higbie of Esterly Schneider & Associates Inc., described the renovation of a century-old administrative building as “an excellent building reuse” in an interview with Springfield Business Journal last month. .

The team gutted the old administration building and completely remodeled and reconfigured the interior, she said.

Joining Esterly Schneider in receiving the award were engineering firms Anderson Engineering Inc., civil; JS Smith Consulting Engineers PC, structure; and Smith-Goth Engineers Inc., mechanical, electrical and plumbing, with general contractor DeWitt & Associates Inc. Latta Technical Services Inc. of Dallas served as the safety consultant and CJW Transportation Consultants LLC served as the highway consultant. Andrea Nesbitt Designs was the interior designer.

Hibgie told SBJ that a renovation project is always more difficult than building from scratch, with challenges removing lead and asbestos and reinforcing the envelope of the existing structure.

She added that seeing the building in use was her favorite part.

“I think the kids loved it,” she said. “They loved the colors, loved the space, the light. You can see it on their faces, how excited they are to be in class.

Higbie praised the team, which she said coordinated effectively during the COVID-19 pandemic to complete the project on time and within the district’s budget.

In a video tribute preceding the award, Gary Doke, superintendent at DeWitt & Associates, said the project initially seemed overwhelming.

“When I got here, I really thought the best thing to do was tear it down,” Doke said, noting that ultimately the project turned out beautifully.

Curtis Chesick, assistant superintendent of the Ozark School District, said during a celebration of the building’s opening that students and staff pieced together a photo first taken in front of the building in 1922.

“They almost match each other,” he said.

Superintendent Chris Bauman said history is important to the district, but so is the education of the children who use the building today. The two come together in the Tiger Paw project.

“I couldn’t have been more proud to be part of this project,” he said.

The two finalists for the award were the Greene County Sheriff’s Department and the Wire Road Brewing Co. design teams.

The annual banquet recognizes local leaders in design and construction. Two Salute Lifetime Achievement Awards were given for lifetime commitment to the design and construction industry. The recipients were Dianne Rankin of Morelock Builders & Associates Inc. and Garry DeLong of DeLong Plumbing, Heating & Air.

The Springfield Contractors Association presented the Developer of the Year award to the Ozarks Technical Community College for the Robert W. Plaster Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

The American Institute of Architects presented the Superintendent of the Year award to Clay Alexander with Snyder Construction Group LLC for his work on Hollister Middle School.

The National Association of Women in Construction presented two Outstanding Women in Construction awards. The Rosebud Award is given to someone who has been in the industry for less than 10 years and was presented to Jadan Scoggins with Commercial Builders LLC. The Vesta Award is given to someone who has worked in the industry for over 10 years and was presented to Joyce Buxton with Buxton Kubik Dodd Design Collective.

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The way we were | The Newtown Bee https://ifawpca.org/the-way-we-were-the-newtown-bee/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 21:03:40 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/the-way-we-were-the-newtown-bee/ November 7, 1997 It’s not a freeway exit, but the handful of residents who live on Old Currituck Road think their quaint little street looks like an off-ramp these days. Workers told a resident on a recent morning that they had been tasked with erecting the wooden double set rails for safety reasons. Recently, a […]]]>

November 7, 1997

It’s not a freeway exit, but the handful of residents who live on Old Currituck Road think their quaint little street looks like an off-ramp these days. Workers told a resident on a recent morning that they had been tasked with erecting the wooden double set rails for safety reasons. Recently, a vehicle driving down Summit Road lost control and nearly rolled over the embankment. City officials therefore concluded that a guardrail should be installed along the entire length of the 100-yard road.

* * * * *

No matter how close the Cyrenius H. Booth Library is to completion, it still seems to be only halfway there. The endless process of cutting something in half proves frustrating for city officials. The project was supposed to be finished more than five months ago, and although the contractor, Building Technologies, Inc of Prospect, is nearing completion, the work is still dragging on. This week, the city gave the man tasked with doing the job another ultimatum: Do it this week or get out.

* * * * *

A man attempted to grab a youngster in a bathroom at Newtown Middle School, Superintendent of Schools John Reed reported to the council on Wednesday, November 5. He got details: the color of his shirt, his height, his nationality. The incident happened around 9.15am on Wednesday, November 5, in the lower part of the C wing. Dr Reed said the police were investigating the matter.

* * * * *

The Legislative Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to designate Sanford Road as a scenic drive, ensuring its beauty is protected for years to come. The Scenic Byway becomes the first road in the city to be granted scenic route status under a recently created Scenic Byway Ordinance. The dirt road, which runs along the shores of Lillinonah Lake near Shepaug Dam, is now protected, by law, from major alterations.

* * * * *

There was some confusion Monday morning at Newtown Middle School after the votes were tallied to determine the winner of the 2nd Annual Carved Scarecrow Contest. It took organizers nearly 24 hours to figure out which team of monster makers was behind Scarecrow Number 29. In the end, it turned out that Scarecrow Number 29 – a scarecrow, really. – belonged to John Bunt, John Catino and Leigh Buckens. The boys had decided they wanted to do some kind of superhero, something that flew, and decided to work on a hobgoblin.

November 3, 1972

Just imagine how the driver of the car at the window of the Union Trust Company in Newtown must have felt queuing behind a horse. But that was the case on Friday afternoon as Black Coal stepped in to get ‘driver’ Cindy Sperling to the bank in time. Cindy traveled from her home on Edge Wood Lane, with Marianne Morhauser as her passenger. While the deposit was being made, the bank teller gave Black Coal two dog biscuits, adding that the bank refused to buy hay on such rare occasions. Perhaps Black Coal would get more attention from Union Trust if it came across horse “penny”.

* * * * *

LE Pelletier of Newtown was elected president of the Connecticut Firemen’s Historical Society at the society’s annual meeting Oct. 27 in Branford. The society is incorporated as a non-profit educational organization to preserve the history of the Connecticut Fire Department and eventually established a fire protection museum. At present, he had a small exhibit at the Barnum Museum in Bridgeport. There are 300 members of the Society, and another Newtowner who is a member is Joseph Wupperfeld, representing Newtown Hook and Ladder Company No. 1

* * * * *

State Inspector John Grossi checked Newtown School buses Oct. 31 for bugs and goblins. The official results will be there in two weeks, but all the buses are roadworthy.

* * * * *

The Garden Club of Newtown gathered at the Spinning Wheel in Redding for their annual luncheon meeting on Tuesday October 31 and announced the recipient of the club’s 1972 Civic Award. James Kearns, Custodian of the Cyrenius H. Booth Library, was singled out for the annual award and received a certificate for his pride and effort in maintaining the grounds around the library and the building itself and keeping them in a still superb condition.

* * * * *

As editor-in-chief Paul S. Smith announced, The Bee’s news coverage is now under the overall responsibility of veteran John Chabot Smith, as editor-in-chief. A former Washington Post and New York Herald Tribune writer, he moved to Newtown last year from Weston, which had been his home for 20 years. The new Mr. Smith on The Bee, known to staff and friends as John, covered local news in Washington and New York, and was a Washington correspondent in Europe during World War II and a correspondent abroad in England after the war. John is a graduate of Princeton University (Phi Beta Kappa) and Cambridge University (First Class Honours). Born in England, he became an American citizen in 1943.

October 31, 1947

Those who think Halloween has always been a night of chasing mischief, preferably with the cops looking the other way indulgently, are centuries apart. This annual period of youthful sabotage began as a serious celebration, marked by many elaborate rites to ward off evil. Pretty much all that remains is the old pinewood and the broomstick, symbols of superstition. … Here in Newtown, on the night of October 31, there are parties planned, civic, private and otherwise. If the goblins don’t understand you – and chances are they won’t – have fun. If you can’t resist the temptation to stick a pin in your doorbell, make sure it’s yours.

* * * * *

Ms. Bertha J. Piper, Director of Occupational Therapy at Fairfield State Hospital, attends the annual meeting of the American Association for Occupational Therapy and the Institute for Psychosomatic Medicine in Coronado, California.

* * * * *

William Hayes of Sandy Hook left Oct. 20 to spend two weeks in Denver, Col., visiting his niece and husband, Mr. and Mrs. JB Espy.

* * * * *

Dr. JLW Jenkins and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Knapp, with Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Swift of Middlebury, left for Bear River, Nova Scotia, on Monday on a bear hunting expedition.

* * * * *

The Newtown section of the State Highway Department was assigned a new KP-11 International truck, which went into service Wednesday for the first time, with Fred Wetmore at the wheel. The truck is a big, orange-colored, efficient-looking piece of equipment, and should prove very useful in the snowstorms of the coming winter months.

* * * * *

The scout cabins are almost complete. Three years ago, a fund of $5,000 was raised to build two cabins that can be used as meeting places for Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in Newtown. Land was purchased opposite Newtown Station and surveyed, and the Boy and Girl Scouts helped dig foundation ditches, cut brush, build a temporary road, haul bricks, drive nails and generally helped some of the fathers get the two cabins erected. The five thousand are exhausted and the two buildings are standing with the walls and roofs finished and one of the two chimneys ready for use. A meeting of the Combined Troop Committees has been called and the building committee will recommend that additional funds be raised to complete the second foyer, doors and windows and floor of the girls cabin so that the scouts can use the cabins this winter.

October 27, 1922

Another of Newtown’s former residents moved on to the ‘Great Beyond’ with the death on Wednesday morning of Sarah Glover Nichols, widow of the late Philo Nichols, the well-known lumber merchant of her day. Mrs. Nichols was 89 years old, the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Villeroy Glover. Mrs. Nichols married Mr. Nichols on February 28, 1854. They established the house in the district of Zoar. Three children have blessed their union. Mrs. Nichols was a woman of the most amiable character, gracious and charitable in her opinions of others, and kind and helpful to all who took pleasure in knowing her.

* * * * *

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Peterson and Roy Peterson of Washington were Allison P. Smith’s guests at dinner at the Parker House on Wednesday. Oscar Peterson’s and Mr. Smith’s birthdays fall on the same day, and once a year the gentlemen get together for dinner. This year it was Mr. Smith’s turn to entertain. There’s a good thing about Mr. Peterson, whom the editor has had the pleasure of knowing for 30 years. He is getting younger every day.

* * * * *

A Nugas outfit was set up in the Hawley School for lab experiments.

* * * * *

Willis F. Arndt, who witnessed the Grange explosion at the Newtown Congregational Church last Tuesday night, lost a fur robe that was used to cover his automobile engine. The car was in front of the church and if anyone had one in his car that didn’t belong to him, Mr. Arndt would be happy to return it to him.

November 5, 1897

The farm, consisting of the house, barn and outbuildings, and 45 acres of land, of Mrs. Sally M. Beardsley of the Dodgingtown district, was sold on Saturday October 23 at public auction to William M. Beardsley of Bridgeport , for $425. Ms. Beardsley will likely move to Bethel and board.

* * * * *

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Peck of Berkshire and Mrs. Charles Bayette of Bridgewater traveled to Boston on the excursion last Friday to return Monday.

* * * * *

Franklin S. Hoyt, principal of New Milford Elementary School, was in town on Sunday, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. AP Smith.

* * * * *

Arthur Moore of Bridgeport died on Sunday along with his parents, Mr and Mrs AC Moore of Taunton District.

* * * * *

Here is a list of letters that remained unused at the Newtown Post Office, November 1, 1897: Wire Facktoriest, Henry Gouxs, George Van Alstyne.—[George F. Duncombe, postmaster.]

Do you have photos of people or places in the city from a bygone era? The Way We Were is the perfect landing spot for your photos to be enjoyed by Newtown Bee readers. Images can be emailed as attachments to shannon@thebee.com, subject: Way We Were photo. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location and the approximate date. If you live locally and would like to lend one or more photos, please call us (203-426-3141) to let us know when you will be visiting..

Newtown Woman’s Club members Lorraine VanderWende (left) and Betty Bussman are shown in this file photo taken Monday, September 5, 1988, Labor Day, outside the CH Booth Library. This is the day the club officially presented its pewter Christmas decoration. VanderWende designed the first ornament, which featured the rooster weather vane atop Newtown Meeting House. Thirty-five years later, the club continues to design and release a new ornament every year. This year’s ornament celebrates the Mounted Guard of the Governor of the Second Company. Ornaments are $20 each and are available from The Newtown Bee office, 5 Church Hill Road; CH Booth Library, 25 Main Street; The Toy Tree, 32 Church Hill Road; and at the Town Clerk’s Office, Newtown Civic Centre, 3 Primrose Street. —Bee stock photo

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Uganda Airlines to Enter Nigeria Aviation Industry in December 2022 https://ifawpca.org/uganda-airlines-to-enter-nigeria-aviation-industry-in-december-2022/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:21:46 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/uganda-airlines-to-enter-nigeria-aviation-industry-in-december-2022/ Lagos State, Africa’s most populous city, faces an economic downturn as commercial drivers in Lagos State announced the start of a seven-day strike. This was revealed by the National Head of the Joint Drivers’ Welfare Association of Nigeria (JDWAN), Akintade S. Abiodun. The notice stated that the Lagos State Commercial Bus Driver under the umbrella […]]]>

Lagos State, Africa’s most populous city, faces an economic downturn as commercial drivers in Lagos State announced the start of a seven-day strike.

This was revealed by the National Head of the Joint Drivers’ Welfare Association of Nigeria (JDWAN), Akintade S. Abiodun.

The notice stated that the Lagos State Commercial Bus Driver under the umbrella of JDWAN had expressed their intention to strike for seven days due to the excessive extortion and unfair harassment they were facing from the from the managers of garages and parks in Lagos State.

The statement read in part, “As commercial drivers in Lagos State under the JDWAN umbrella, we have no choice but to embark on a seven day protest and boycott of services against the multiple and excessive extortion by management State parks and garages.

“We have informed members of the public and the Lagos State Government of the multiple and excessive extortions by the management of the car parks and garages.

The statement revealed that excessive extortion and illegal ticketing affect not only the cost of transportation, but also the cost of goods and services and, eventually, the cost of living. JDWAN members said they lost most of their income to Motor Park ticketing and when they refuse to comply, they are arrested.

“The cost of transport affects the cost of goods and services and hence the cost of living, which has skyrocketed in Lagos State due to the effect of excessive and illegal ticketing of car parks and tolls at almost every bus stop.

“We have been condemned to extortion and violent harassment by the state transportation agencies – the Lagos State Motor Parks and Garages Authority and the Lagos State Guardians Committee.

“Every day we lose half of our income to the boys in the car park. We pay exorbitant fees at garages and at every bus stop where we drop off passengers, whether we pick up passengers or not, we pay morning , midday and evening.Some routes have 25 bus stops which also serve as illegal tax collection routes.

The association, in its statement, said it refuses any unfair treatment, opposing the illegal payment of tickets to park thugs at every bus stop, while calling on the Lagos State government to immediately put end to harassment by law enforcement.

“Any illegal money paid after leaving garages and parks should be removed immediately. The harassment of law enforcement and intimidation with firearms, cutlasses and broken bottles by LASTMA, the task force and the RRS must stop immediately. They collaborate and hire thugs to attack and extort us every day without violating any law.

“We demand that the Lagos State Government provide official bus stops in every community to avoid the relentless arrests and stress of commuters who complain of having to travel several miles to return to their bus stops.”

The association has warned that failure to comply with their demands by the Lagos State government will lead to large-scale protest and an all-out boycott, as this seven-day strike is only a warning.

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Fox News Used ‘Fake and Crudely Edited’ Audio to Target SC Schools, Says Nonprofit CEO | Colombia News https://ifawpca.org/fox-news-used-fake-and-crudely-edited-audio-to-target-sc-schools-says-nonprofit-ceo-colombia-news/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/fox-news-used-fake-and-crudely-edited-audio-to-target-sc-schools-says-nonprofit-ceo-colombia-news/ LEXINGTON — A Fox News story that blamed a South Carolina school district for allegedly pushing “critical race theory” was based on doctored sound, according to the head of EL Education, a for-profit entrepreneur nonprofit whose employee was in the story. “We are satisfied that the audio has been cut and edited to distort the […]]]>

LEXINGTON — A Fox News story that blamed a South Carolina school district for allegedly pushing “critical race theory” was based on doctored sound, according to the head of EL Education, a for-profit entrepreneur nonprofit whose employee was in the story.

“We are satisfied that the audio has been cut and edited to distort the actual speaker comments and give a false impression of the EL Education program,” EL Education CEO Scott Hartl said Oct. 31.

“A simple set of answers to commonly asked questions has been deliberately twisted into a false and crudely edited narrative linking EL Education pedagogy to controversial and political topics.”

Lawmakers from the South Carolina Freedom Caucus said they received the audio recording of an “anonymous whistleblower,” whose identity they declined to reveal. They denied any involvement in the production or editing of the clip. The Right Caucus and Fox News both released the audio on Oct. 25.

The recording is believed to be by EL Education professional development specialist Tamika Sullivan, who has ties to Lexington County School District 1, mentioned in the clip. Neither the district nor EL Education confirmed that the voice was Sullivan’s, but neither did they deny it.

The caucus and Fox News alleged that the audio shows the district was trying to “circumvent state law” with a program focused on critical race theory. Fox News did not respond to questions from The Post and Courier regarding the alleged audio tampering.

New York-based EL Education partnered with the state’s sixth-largest school district in 2013 for leadership development and instructional coaching, and has since played a role in six schools in the district, which includes cities of Lexington, Gilbert and Pelion.

In the audio clip, the speaker, who appears to be Sullivan, mentions his organization’s relationship with the Lexington One District and “critical race theorists” in what appeared to be the same conversation.

In the audio recording, he is heard saying that EL Education’s curriculum is written to “include culturally relevant instruction.” The speaker said they could teach “counter-stories”, which they explained as stories from the perspective of someone whose experience differs from that of another story, and used the US Constitution and the experience of a person of color as an example.

This, along with the academic term “culturally relevant pedagogy” and how certain parts of a person’s identity can be “privileged”, can “gross people”, it has been heard.

An Oct. 25 Fox News article quoted the speaker as saying, “bringing culture into the classroom and honoring and respecting the tenets of critical race theory.”

But the audio-editing work contrasts with the article’s written version of the quote, which omitted words that were erased from the audio without showing anything had been skipped.

In the audio, the speaker can be heard saying the words “bringing student cultures into the classroom and honoring and respecting them…” before the audio cuts out. The audio fades in: “…the tenets of critical race theory are this, a social construct – race is a social construct, race is endemic.” What happened between these two sections or if they even deal with the same general topic is unclear.

Political reaction

State Rep. RJ May, R-Lexington, a member of the South Carolina Freedom Caucus, said after hearing the audio clip he became convinced the schools were illegally indoctrinating students.

“Over the past two years, parents have been abused by the educational institution,” May said in a caucus statement. Caucus Vice Chairman, known for his hard-line conservatism, May went on to say that the recording shows that the schools “welcome organizations that intentionally break the law.”

May called for legislative action in response to the tip, including a total ban on critical race theory. He said on Oct. 27 that he thought the audio recording, along with the anti-racist rhetoric on EL Education’s website, was all he needed to hear and see.

The state representative for Lexington District 88 said he receives emails and phone calls at least once a week from parents complaining about things like racially separated students in the classroom, or homework “check your privilege”, or said they were inherently less likely to succeed as people of color.

May credited local teachers and families for helping Lexington One students succeed academically. He said EL Education had nothing to do with the school district’s recent accomplishments, which include the SC Association of School Administrators Secondary Principal of the Year award and having a school named Palmetto’s Finest. High School in 2019.

School district and contractor push back

While EL Education is working with Lexington One schools, including River Bluff High School, Gilbert Middle and High Schools, Meadow Glen Elementary and Middle Schools, and Lakeside Middle School, Lexington One spokeswoman Megan Moore said said the nonprofit group’s work focuses on professional development and helping teachers. foster an environment for students to sharpen their academic skills.

Moore noted that the person featured in the audio is not employed by the school district.

“This individual’s comments were made outside of a professional setting and do not represent the views or educational practices of Lexington County School District 1,” Moore said. “Lexington District One will continue to address this issue and is committed to ensuring that all schools in Lexington District One adhere to South Carolina standards and statutes.”

EL Education President and CEO Scott Hartl said the audio actually came from an EL employee. But he said the circumstances involved an apparent trick to obtain the audio which was then edited to produce the politically sensational clip.

Hartl said a hotel employee claiming to be interested in teaching recorded the audio during a conversation with an EL employee in the hotel lobby. Someone then pieced together pieces of the audio that ended up in the hands of Fox News.

Fox News did not respond to a request for comment on Hartl’s claims.

A spokesperson for EL Education also said the nonprofit’s curricula do not include critical race theory.

“EL Education’s curriculum is grounded in the science of reading and learning, and is designed to help students from all backgrounds feel welcome at school and succeed academically by sharpening their thinking skills so they can come to their own conclusions,” the spokesperson said.


Columbia Area School District State Report Cards Highlight Climate, Safety and Learning

EL Education also works with schools in the state’s largest and second largest districts, Greenville and Charleston counties. In 2020, River Bluff High School received a “credit” from the non-profit organization, which they issue to schools in their network for “excellence in character development and academic achievement.”

The organization helped develop a program at River Bluff called “Crew” which for teachers is a team-building program, and for students is a random grouping of them regardless of background or background. grade level to organically foster study groups and mentoring.

Click here for more news from Columbia, SC


Former Charleston Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait Takes Job in Lexington District

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I was fired by the APHL for bringing a bicycle to a national meeting in a convention center https://ifawpca.org/i-was-fired-by-the-aphl-for-bringing-a-bicycle-to-a-national-meeting-in-a-convention-center/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 09:40:16 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/i-was-fired-by-the-aphl-for-bringing-a-bicycle-to-a-national-meeting-in-a-convention-center/ No regrets renting and talking about it In my last heartbreaking failure, I was fired by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) for bringing my rental bike into the APHL Newborn Screening Symposium 2022 hosted by the Newborn Screening Technical Assistance and Evaluation Program (NewSTEPs) on Sunday, October 16 at the Greater Tacoma Convention […]]]>
No regrets renting and talking about it

In my last heartbreaking failure, I was fired by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) for bringing my rental bike into the APHL Newborn Screening Symposium 2022 hosted by the Newborn Screening Technical Assistance and Evaluation Program (NewSTEPs) on Sunday, October 16 at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center. Or, perhaps more accurately, I was fired by APHL contractor Insight Global for discussing bicycle safety at the APHL Newborn Screening Symposium 2022 at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center in a manner that, although social distancing was maintained and the only threats made were APHL staff against my rental bike, was not acceptable to the APHL. Anyway, some idiots working in public health who care about future generations fired me for bringing a bike to their national meeting at a convention center.

NewSTEPs is publicly funded largely by the Health Resources and Services Administration as part of national efforts to maintain and upgrade health data portals, access and utility. These are great programs that exemplify good government, but there are still fools involved who fire people for bringing a bike to a national meeting at a convention center. APHL has failed to work in a modern urban setting. Coming back to babies, where the focus should be, newsteps.org is outdated and unprepared for next-gen newborn screening. NewSTEPs five-year funding cycle will be submitted/approved in the coming months. Is Newsteps.org hosted by APHL the best we can do?

It took me hours and hours of phone calls over several days and weeks to find this bike rental. It finally arrived in the final days of Lone Pine Adventures, in Tacoma and Gig Harbor, run with the generous support of Old Town Bicycle. I have no idea of ​​their political affiliations. I only know that the kind owner runs a worthy business, burdened with huge insurance costs in a car-infested America. They rent quality bikes in the South Sound area. They work to stay afloat while the owner’s nursing wife gives them plenty of support. Among the details discussed on the phone prior to arrival, I promised Lone Pine that I would not lock the bike outside unattended in Tacoma.

Once in Tacoma, the meeting was great. I cried much of the first day as I met people who gave life and hope through newborn screening, as well as thinking of my own family and our physically and mentally challenged sister. The organizers of the APHL and NewSTEPs did a good job except for the neglect of bike safety and the intolerance of bike safety conversations at a national meeting in a convention center . I would have liked to provide more warnings on the bike, but please see the paragraph above, and the organizers were so busy. You could have honored my request to speak directly with the convention center staff. You could have talked to me anytime after that 5 minute conversation, but you chose the HR route. Great professional culture including NewSTEPs and APHL.


Here’s what happened, if I remember correctly.

I flew and took the $3.25 bus from SeaTac to Tacoma, on which I also paid the fare of a cashless person right in front of me who happened to be returning from a conference Pathology Fellowship in Sydney to join her participating spouse our the APHL Newborn Screening Symposium 2022. Lone Pine Adventures dropped the bike off with me in front of the Murano Hotel (teal roof light great for navigation, BTW).

It was afternoon and the meeting had started, so I headed to the convention center as soon as I was ready. I disassembled the bike outside, walked in with it, and sought to speak to the staff at the convention center, visible in black and white, to inquire about bike storage. If they couldn’t provide secure bike storage, I wanted them to pass the request on to the management chain for future events.

Before I joined them, the APHL staff walked up to me and we started with distant co-worker greetings. We talked about the bike. They told me it was not allowed in the convention center. I acknowledged that the bike would probably end up in my hotel room and asked that they let me discuss it with the staff at the convention center.

Soon there was concern about taking care of members and time. I said I could take care of the bike and tried to continue with the convention center staff. I always wanted the convention center to be aware of cycling and my request for secure bike storage.

Before this conversation with an APHL staff member was over, another APHL staff member approached and became involved. They reiterated that bikes were not allowed inside. I tried to make sure they knew I wanted my request for secure bike storage to go through management.

I inquired about leaving the bike in an organizer’s break room. I also asked what would happen if I left the bike in an unused room. I was told by an APHL staff member that they take unattended bikes outside and drop them off on the street. I responded by asking if they had an unattended bag policy. No answer. I repeated my question. They said it was different. In an understatement, I said it was similar and neither I nor the owner of the $1000 bike would appreciate a bike being treated so harshly.

By then, several APHL staff had gathered. None of them expressed sympathy towards cycling or my situation. Nobody thought about the painful plantar fasciitis I told them about in previous meetings. I felt belittled by the APHL staff who intercepted me and tried to prevent a civil and respectful conversation. I felt compelled to quietly comply with their disdain for bringing a bike to a national meeting at a convention center. I repeated that I had tried to extricate myself from the conversation and they kept it going. I sincerely apologized for taking the three minutes (5 maybe) it took for our conversation about a bike and took the bike to my hotel room after a brief and respectful conversation, as I wished, with the staff of the convention center.

I commented on the meeting here.


That was it. I left shaken and wondering if I should apologize for the way I looked, but never for what I said. I see no reason to apologize for biking, being passionate about it, or anything I said at the Tacoma Convention Center on October 16th.

That was the last I heard of the encounter until 4 p.m. on Friday, October 29, when a representative from the contractor called me to tell me that I had been fired as I was finishing an afternoon of connecting the DB to R at the start of production of R Shiny dashboards.

I was doing this because the need for dashboards is well known in my old team at APHL, and I had time while waiting for the correct configurations for my development environment from the website contractor .

I have contributed to R Shiny work and run R Shiny servers, as well as RAILS, Django and GMOD tools in Apache and Nginx systems. I know a little about what exists. Your current technology and database will not reduce Next Generation Newborn Screening, newsteps.org and APHL.

APHL obviously doesn’t appreciate my advice. For the sake of infants, I hope that they or future managers of infant screening data will find the will to transition to the technology, platforms and tools capable of handling next-generation newborn screening. Take a look at newsteps.org for yourself and see how ready it is for omics, computing, messaging, or other modern technologies. Try not to think about their disaster recovery or business continuity. Do babies with treatable rare diseases deserve? I tried to help, but I was not well received at the APHL.

Maybe I’m wrong about the reasons for the shooting. Perhaps it was my inability to show up for a meeting at 7 a.m. on Monday. It was stupid. I checked my schedule around 7:30. I made it to the rest of the meetings though. Even moved chairs in a crowded room. Maybe I got fired for too much of my untimely dry sarcasm. I never heard a word about it, but it could be due to my opaque density to messaging.

Anyway, no one at APHL helped me figure it out. It wasn’t my job or my effort. No one expressed dissatisfaction with my production, other than shared frustration with my lack of a development environment for the required workspaces. Even then, I was backed with 100 hours of orientation granted, of which I only used a handful.

My only indications of my termination are that my work was received with satisfaction and encouragement, and the APHL asked the recruiter to tell me that I had been terminated following a heated conversation the previous week. There were no other heated conversations, and the one about bringing a bicycle into a convention center during a national meeting could have been far more controversial. I complied with whatever they wanted except closing my mouth just when they wanted it to close.

In short, APHL handled my situation with complete and unprofessional disregard for the organization, the company, or me personally, likely all in accordance with HR and legal advice.

It is sad to think how much I trusted and confided in my colleagues at APHL. Does anyone out there appreciate that I tried to share my best work with you? Of course not, I said it wrong, apparently.

If you learn from mistakes with me, APHL, then get the next developer set up with a code-contributing development environment ASAP. Once again, I forget that the APHL does not take my advice into account.

Here is another suggestion for my immediate supervisor at APHL. If you’re looking for an intelligent conversation about agriculture, there’s no point in starting with food shame. In the unlikely event that you are serious about food, then I will ask why is this store bought meat not acceptable to you? Where should people get protein? There have been many good conversations about such things at Daily Kos over the years. I highly recommend each of the Anti-Capitalist Meetup writers for insightful discussions.

Funny thing is, food shaming happened at the same meetings where I was fired for bringing a bike to a national meeting at a convention center. Even more hilarious are the repeated calls from the APHL to recruit tech specialists as they fire me, and my three decades of experience bringing a bike to a national meeting at a convention center. . Really forward thinking there, APHL.

Finally, I will never work for the APHL again, but I still want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the widespread need for reconciliation and the great work of groups such as Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Now for some Jerry.

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South Hutchinson seeks new water pricing study https://ifawpca.org/south-hutchinson-seeks-new-water-pricing-study/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:53:20 +0000 https://ifawpca.org/south-hutchinson-seeks-new-water-pricing-study/ SOUTH HUTCHINSON – South Hutchinson City Council made some decisions Monday evening as part of the continued search for additional water for the city. But larger questions continue to hover over this complex issue. The council, by consensus, directed City Administrator Joseph Turner to continue a water rate study while continuing negotiations with the Town […]]]>

SOUTH HUTCHINSON – South Hutchinson City Council made some decisions Monday evening as part of the continued search for additional water for the city. But larger questions continue to hover over this complex issue.

The council, by consensus, directed City Administrator Joseph Turner to continue a water rate study while continuing negotiations with the Town of Hutchinson on a plan to purchase water from it in the future. .

The council also advised Turner to file an appeal with the Equus Beds Groundwater Management District over its denial of an application to allow the city to tap an existing well for additional water by converting a irrigation well nearby in municipal well.

Turner asked if the council should seek some sort of formal citizen input before proceeding with a plan to bring water from Hutchinson into the city, noting “there are political issues involved when you are permanently attached to the ‘water supply from another city’.

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